The Ables by Jeremy Scott

the ables jeremy scott book review rachel poli

Title: The Ables
Author: Jeremy Scott
Genre: Fantasy
How I got the book: I bought it

Summary (from Amazon):

It wasn’t the “sex talk” he expected. Phillip Sallinger’s dad has told him he’s a custodian–a guardian–and his genetically inherited power is telekinesis. He’ll learn to move objects with his mind. Excited to begin superhero high school until he discovers he’s assigned to a “special ed” class for disabled empowered kids, he suddenly feels like an outsider. Bullied, threatened, and betrayed, Phillip struggles, even as he and his friends–calling themselves the Ables–find ways to maximize their powers to overcome their disabilities, and are the first to identify the growing evil threatening humanity. As vital custodians disappear and the custodian leadership is mired in indecision, a mysterious and powerful figure taunts Phillip, and the enemy is poised to strike. But what if the next “one who does all,” the multi-gifted custodian predicted to come, is one of the Ables?

My Review (may contain spoilers!):

It took me two months to read this 364-page book. Why? I don’t know because it was a pretty good book.

I thought the characters were good and well thought out. They’re disabled teenagers who have superpowers. Most people have an advantage with their super powers, but these guys don’t. For example, the main character has telekinesis, but he’s blind. He has to work through his disability to train his ability.

The overall story is a bit cliche. A group of teenagers discover they have powers and the whole city they live in is riddled with superheroes. Most people don’t believe in them because of their disabilities, but they end up saving the world anyway.

The only unique twist about it is that they are all disabled in some way or another that hinders their powers.

So the plot wasn’t bad and the characters were easy to get along with. However, the format of the novel was different that normal. There were gaps in between each paragraph and nothing was indented, which is just another style, but I’m not used to it. So it was kind of hard for me to get through.

The Ables by Jeremy Scott gets 4 out of 5 stars.

Favorite Quote:

“A hero is only a hero because he or she walks into that situation knowing full well they may not walk out. Whether they save the day or die trying, they’re heroes because they make the sacrifice just by showing up.” –Jeremy Scott, The Ables

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George And Me

In yesterday’s post, I discussed how every author puts a little bit of themselves (or something from their life) into their novels. For me, there are numerous things I throw into my novels that are inspired by true things in life. I won’t spill all my secrets, so for now I’ll just explain my good friend George Florence.

20150115_170826George, my protagonist, is a 30-year-old laid-off detective trying to make a place for himself in the world while doing what he loves: helping people and fighting crime.

Being a police officer was something I wanted to do when I was very young. Even when I knew I wanted to be a teacher and writer, I still had a spot in my mind that wanted to be a cop. I wanted to be a teacher since I was six-years-old because of my first grade teacher. I wanted to be a writer since I was ten-years-old because of Kris. Where did this cop thing come from? I have no idea.

When I was little I was always fascinated with that sort of thing. I remember I had a spy kit with handcuffs, a decoder, a notepad, and–the best part–rear-view sunglasses. I was always trying to solve “mysteries” around the house. One time, Kris and I eavesdropped on my mom’s phone call because we were looking for “evidence” in our case, “Mom’s Cooking: Real or Take-Out?” I can’t remember how old we were, but I wish I did.

However despite my fascination, I never pursued it for a plethora of reasons. I’m tiny and have no upper body strength, I can’t stand loud noises, I’m squeamish, and I’m not good under pressure. I just don’t think it wouldn’t have worked out. Of course you never know until you try, but I think when I discovered teaching/writing, my heart changed its mind.

I have written a few novels. Most of them are fantasy-ish with the main characters having super powers. A couple of them are cliche high school drama stories. Each one of those manuscripts (five of them total) are still on the first draft. I congratulate myself for completing a novel, but editing them is just not something I have the motivation to do.

20150115_170900Then I created George. He was a silly character started in a yellow notebook a few years ago at Barnes and Noble when I didn’t know what else to write.

I say he was a “silly” character because that’s entirely what he was. He was originally a detective who did well at his job, but had no common sense whatsoever. He was comical. I didn’t expect to go anywhere with it, but I liked the story. I wrote 32 notebook pages before I stopped and moved onto something else.

Who knew that years later George would rise to the surface and be who he is today?

Unlike my other novels, I completed a first draft easily and then had the urge to edit it right away. I want to continue his story. I want to write more books about him. I want to publish them all. Needless to say, I think I have found my genre for writing.

Funny how it turned out to be a secret passion of mine.

It’s also funny because George was inspired by Phoenix Wright, a character from the Ace Attorney video game series. I played those games and wanted to write my own mysteries and decided to revive George as my main man.

Of course… now that I write this post I realize that George wasn’t originally based off of Phoenix Wright. He was based off of me.