My Camp NaNoWriMo Goals

2019 is already a quarter gone. Which is totally weird to me, but hey! It’s the first Camp NaNoWriMo session of the month and I’m super excited to be working on a new project and some old ones. So, here are my Camp NaNoWriMo goals for the month.

My Camp NaNoWriMo Goals | NaNoWriMo | Creative Writing | Blogging | Wattpad | RachelPoli.com

Crossroads

This is a working title for my next Wattpad novella. It’s an RPG-style fantasy. It’s unlike anything I’ve ever written before. It was inspired by the video game Octopath Traveler. I created my own world and characters. I made great outlining progress on it in March and have been breezing through the first few chapters in this past couple of days. I can’t wait to see how the first draft turns out! Crossroads will be coming to my Wattpad on June 3, 2019.

George Florence & The Perfect Alibi

George and Lilah are killing me. We’ve been together for so long at this point that they really just need to find their own place and get out of the nest. Don’t get me wrong, I love them to pieces. But this book, the first in a series, has been a work in progress since 2011 – give or take. So, this month, I’ll be continuing the revising stage. I’m only going to work on it during weeks two and four of Camp NaNo though. I don’t want to work on too many projects in one day for an entire month straight. In addition to revising, I’ll also be continuing my timeline for the whole series and planning the other books. I need to get my head on straight with this one.

Sunday Morning (Vol. 1)

Of course, I’ll be working on some finishing touches, marketing, etc. This collection of flash fiction will be here at the end of the month! More information is on my Patreon Page and I’ll also be talking about it more in-depth on the blog tomorrow, April 4. Yes, this means a release date (which you might already know if you head over to Patreon).

Sunday Morning (Vol. 2)

There is a title for this one that I’m not sharing yet. The first volume compiles the first 53 stories I’ve ever posted on my blog, revised and remastered. I’m taking the next 52 stories from the blog and putting them into volume 2. I’ll spend the final two days of Camp NaNo putting this together before I begin the rewriting stage in May.

What are your Camp NaNoWriMo goals? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

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How Many Drafts Does It Take?

When I first started writing, I often wondered how many drafts it would take me to “complete” my manuscript. Before I could submit it places for publication, how many drafts would I have to write, edit, rewrite, and the like? Of course, the more I wrote, the more I realized there’s no true answer to how many drafts does it take to write a novel?

How Many Drafts Does It Take | Creative Writing | Writing | Novel Writing | Writing Tips | Writing Community | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

My First Manuscript

I completed the first draft of my very first novel back in 2010. It’s been nine years and I don’t even know how long since I last touched it. I still have the manuscript and I’m on the eighth draft. It’s still not done. At this point, it will never be done.

Being the first novel I had ever written, I know it’s not going to see the light of day. I’m not even sure if I like the idea enough to ever go back to it and try to rewrite the story. Maybe someday I’ll share some bits of it, but today is not that day.

I Thought I Needed A Lot Of Drafts

Of course, that particular novel had a lot of drafts because I didn’t know much of what I was doing. I thought it needed to be perfect, which there is no such thing. I also thought that having multiple drafts and a crap ton of ink-filled paper meant that I was a “real writer.” That novel wasn’t a manuscript unless I had a handful of stacks of that same manuscript riddled with black and red ink.

But you don’t need a lot of drafts. You just need as many as you think it will take to tell the story at a polished level. When do you know it’s polished? That’s harder to tell because we all strive for the novel to be as perfect as can be.

It Depends On Style And Genre Too

I write mostly novels. I have written a couple of novellas. I have written short stories and compiled them into a collection. I’ve even written poetry and scripts. I find the longer it is, the more drafts you may have. You can’t catch everything in one sitting.

I was on my second or third draft of George Florence and the Perfect Alibi before I rewrote the whole book with a POV change. Now I’m on the third or fourth draft of that. So, you figure all together I have about six or seven drafts of that manuscript. Meanwhile, my novellas on Wattpad only took one round of edits.

It’s All Up To You

Whatever you think you’re novel needs, do it. Just don’t overdo it.

How many drafts do your novels typically take until they’re complete? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Why The First Draft Is Easy

So, I mentioned yesterday that the first draft is probably the easiest part of writing. I mean, it’s hard because the blank page can be mocking and it’s hard to even get started. But I think the first draft is the easiest part of the whole writing process for a few different reasons.

Why the first draft is easy | novel writing | creative writing | RachelPoli.com

You’re Telling Yourself The Story

Who else is better to tell your story than you? Everyone has a story – fiction or nonfiction. Yes, it’s hard to get started, but once you do, the words can easily flow from the page. Being able to follow your imagination and letting your creativity go free is one of the easiest things you can do – as long as you allow yourself to let loose. Yes, we all get creative blocks, but those can be easily dealt with.

It’s Supposed To Suck

No one publishes their first draft. If they do, then it either didn’t sell well or they write like a God. So, allow yourself to write awful. Whatever ideas come to your mind, just write them down and use them. They may not stick, but at least you tried and new ideas may come from them. Ideas stem from other ideas, good or bad. When you allow yourself to write bad, the first draft can be so easy because your fingers just keep typing away at the keyboard.

I’d say don’t bother to edit or fix typos either, but… that bothers me too, so…

There Are No Rules

Whatever rules are in place, they were meant to be broken. Yes, there are rules to writing. Grammar is important. However, there are no rules to tell a story. Tell your story how you want. There will be people who tell you you’re doing it “wrong” or they don’t approve. In the end, it’s their opinion. You tell the story you want it be told… just, you know, make sure it makes sense.

Do you agree with me? Let me know in the comments below. If you enjoyed this post, please share it around!

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How To Outline A Series

It can be hard enough to outline a single book but when it comes to writing a book series, it’s even harder. You can outline each book individually or you can outline the series as a whole. Depending on the length of the series and its genre you can choose what would work best for the project and you. So, here’s how to outline a series.

How To Outline A Series | Creative writing | writing | novel writing | outline | novel outline | RachelPoli.com

What’s the main idea?

Each book has its own main idea, central plot point, or theme. When it comes to outlining your series, you can list the main ideas for each book as well as the series as a whole. What’s the point of each book in the series and why do we need many books to get to the end of the major plot? What’s going to happen from point A to point B to keep readers buying the next book in the series?

Brainstorm these plot points

If you’re going to outline the series as a whole rather than each individual book as you write them, make a list of plot points that should happen from the beginning of book one to the end of the final book. This will help move the plot along and stretch it out for as long as the series needs to be. This will also help give you a rough idea of how many books you may need.

Summarize each book

Even though the books in the series will work together to get to a common end, each book should still have it’s own goal and plot points to be wrapped up at the end of each book. Summarizing each individual plot as well as the overall picture of the series will help keep you and the series organized. It gives each book more of a purpose and makes it more fun and entertaining.

Create a timeline

One way to help summarize each book and/or the series is to create a timeline. I’ve done that for my mystery series and it’s helped a lot. It helps keep track of the evidence and details of each case as well as dates and just the general “what happens when.” Creating a timeline is easier than it seems – well, it’s hard only if you don’t know all the information you want to fill in. There’s no wrong way to create a timeline though, which is great.

Do you outline your series as a whole or not? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

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3 Elements To Include In Your Novel Outline

There are many things to include in a novel outline. Some writers don’t outline at all and some only outline a little bit. However, there are certain elements to include in your novel outline in order to have a thorough one.

There are five elements that go into writing a novel. Some of these elements should be included in your novel outline as a base. You can do this before you start writing and then add in all the filler and details later.

3 Elements to Include in Your Novel Outline | Creative writing | novel writing | writing tips | blogging | RachelPoli.com

1. Premise

This is the big idea of the whole novel. What’s the plot? Why is it important? What’s the protagonist’s objective? What’s the antagonist’s or villain’s objective? Conflict? There’s a lot that goes into the basic plot. All you need are some ideas for why this story needs to be told. Why will readers want to pick it up and keep reading?

2. Characters

Jot down a bare list of characters and get to know them a little bit. List the main character, the bad guys, secondary and minor characters, sidekicks, and everyone in between. Some characters may not exist yet, but it’s nice to have a list to keep track of names and physical descriptions.

3. Setting

Where does your novel take place? Where are your characters from? What are some locations your characters may visit throughout the events of the novel?

There are a lot more that should go into your novel. Major and minor plot points, scene ideas, and a lot more. However, these three elements are the basic gist of your novel. Once you figure this out, writing should – hopefully – be smooth sailing.

What are some major points you include in your novel outline? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

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