Inspiration Station: When and Why Did You Begin Writing? With Sacha Black

As you know, guest bloggers appear on my site twice a month. For the months of August, September, and October, my guests will be discussing the same topic:

When and why did you begin writing?

This week we’ll learn a little bit more about Sacha Black. Thanks, Sacha!

Inspiration Station: When and Why Did You Begin Writing? With Sacha Black

I had a cupboard.

I was nine and it was built into my bedroom wall like an adults’ closet, a fact I used to feel smug about because it was in my room and not my parent’s.

At first, I used to store things in it, like toys and roller skates. Then after a particularly bad day at school with bullies, I came home and wanted to hide. Usually, I’d grab a book and run into the fields to climb a tree and read till sunset. But it was winter and by the time I was home from school, darkness had fallen.

I looked at the cupboard – it was just big enough for one small child to fit inside. So I yanked open the door and threw everything into the middle of my bedroom floor. I sat inside and slammed the door shut. I cried, not because of the bullies, but because it was cold, dark and uncomfortable and not the safe haven I’d expected.

I took pillows, a blanket, a torch and what I’d thought was a book back into the cupboard. But it wasn’t a reading book, it was a sketch book. Instead of finding a reading book, I grabbed a pen and started doodling. Doodles turned to words, which turned into a story. That was the first real story I ever wrote, and I wrote it in a cupboard!

The creatures in the story were called Praeth. Even then I wrote fantasy, it was my little way of escaping, of creating worlds where I would fit in and didn’t have to explain myself or be the school weirdo because I liked books and studied hard.

I rewrote that story several more times, expanding and building each time as my skills and knowledge developed. That short story called Praeth eventually got so long that on August 20th 2016, twenty years after I inked the first full stop, it was a completed novel called Keepers. Next year, I’ll publish it, and I’ll put the first copy next to that very first notebook which I still have.

Why do I write? I write because stories are woven into my blood like oxygen. When I was created, instead of filling my DNA with genetic material, someone put characters and words into there and now those characters’ bark at me until I sit down and pen their stories. They demand to be told like the government demands taxes. This isn’t a choice. I was born to tell stories.

Author’s Bio:

Sacha is a nightwalker carefully treading the line between light and dark, strange and unusual. A hunter desperately pursuing the right words to chronicle stories. Sacha was always meant to write, she was the girl who spent her lunch break tucked away in the corner of the school library, head buried in a pile of books, pencil in hand, weaving stories on the page. But she grew up, stumbled and fell forgetting her dream and then spent a while lost in a dark and twisted place. Then, one day she sat in front of her laptop and started to write. She remembered that all she’d ever wanted to do was write stories in faraway places filled with curious creatures and magical happenings. Sacha is also a mother to a toddler terror tot and wife to a beautiful woman.

Connect with Sacha:

Website

Email list (full of juicy writing tips and the latest industry publishing news)

Twitter

Facebook

Pinterest

Google+

Instagram

Advertisements

Inspiration Station: When and Why Did You Start Writing? With Nthato Morakabi

As you know, guest bloggers appear on my site twice a month. For the months of August, September, and October, my guests will be discussing the same topic:

When and why did you begin writing?

This week we’ll learn a little bit more about Nthato Morakabi. Thanks, Nthato!

Inspiration Station with Nthato Morakabi: when and why did you begin writing?

Writing: A Privilege and an Honour

I think a majority of writers start at an early age, and I am no different from the flock. The oldest piece of writing I found was in an old diary when I was between the ages of six and eight. My piece of creative writing featured my own version of the lyrics to the song La Bamba performed by Ritchie Valens in the film of the same name as the song. Something along the lines of “La la la la la Bamba I was born in Soweto.” I imagine my parents dancing to the off-tune vocals of young me while their faces wondered when the madness would stop. It didn’t. I wrote more than just lyrics and in Grade 2 (second grade), I was fast becoming an avid reader.

My reasons for writing have evolved from those formative years and has become a more refined version, something I experienced quite a couple of years ago. But initially, it was for the praise of my parents and teachers. I wrote to please others. I remember freaking out during creative writing because the story I wanted to write ended up with such a large scope it wouldn’t fit the word count, and I would whip up something quickly in the last ten minutes. At least that hasn’t changed, I still can’t keep word counts.

It was in Grade 9 when I really started writing for myself. I was so consumed by the fictional worlds that existed around me that I had to delve into them. If they weren’t big enough I created my own. I spent a lot of time in class writing my stories rather than taking notes; the only thing that helped me pass was my strong short-term memory: study the night before, go to bed, retain what I studied and write exams/tests; forget it all the moment it’s pens down. This was where I started thinking of writing as more than just a hobby; I wanted to be a writer. I had stories man. Tons of stories. I had a file where I kept all my drafts and documents and ideas; any empty notebook immediately became a story book. If I saw a blank page, I saw potential. Of course, I was also frequenting the school library, determined to read every Stephen King, Clive Barker, James Herbert, Dean Koontz and any other horror author I could find. These pulled into my writing. Anime I was watching pulled into my writing. Games I played pulled into my stories. I fell in love with Final Fantasy not only for its amazing CGI (which at that day and age was far ahead of its time) but also for its intriguing stories, characters, and villains.

I look back now and see how my education, upbringing, and circumstances have allowed me to be the writer I am today. It truly is a privilege to sit here and type this out with speedy, proficient keystrokes, to be able to string thoughts together using letters and words formed back in school when I was a young lyrical genius (sarcasm). It’s been quite a journey already and I look forward to enjoying the remaining years achieving my goal of becoming a full-time author – I’m a full-time writer by profession after all.

Author’s Bio:

Nthato Morakabi is a South African author working as a Junior Technical Writer for Everlytic and a freelance writer for Gamecca Magazine. He has a total of seven published short stories, available in separate anthologies on Amazon and Chasing Dreams Publishing website. He is currently working on personal anthologies, one of which will be on Patreon.
He is a hobbyist blogger, avid reader, and aspiring digital artist.
Connect with Nthato:
Twitter: @Nthito

When A Schedule Falls Apart

I’ve always been the type of person to have a schedule, to get myself into a routine. I write a to-do list for the following day every night before I go to bed. I even include “shower” on those lists. Yeah, I’m that kind of person.

The summer was great. I was home alone for the majority of the day while everyone else was at work. I read, I wrote, I blogged, I swam, I played with the animals, took walks, among other things. But mostly I was able to get a lot of writing, reading, and blogging done.

I had a good rhythm going for a while. Then work started back up again.

Today is my seventh day of work, but I feel like I’ve been back for months. I still babysit every day after work as well and, on top of that, I’m still running the Sunday school program at my church.

I enjoy all three jobs, but it’s exhausting. Nine to ten hours of my day is gone as I chase preschoolers around the majority of the day only to go help a couple of elementary kids do their homework. There’s not much room for writing during those times.

Sunday mornings are blocked off because I’m at church and I do the majority of the Sunday school planning in my free time at my house during the week. Still, not much room for writing.

Before I started back to work, I attempted to create a new “schedule” for myself. I knew it was going to be a flexible one, but I thought that if I could get in just one hour a day of reading and then one hour of writing or blogging, that’d be great.

I still keep up with my routine where I write on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays and I work on my blogs on Thursdays and Fridays. Sundays are either/or, or I just take a break.

But the hour a day? It hasn’t been working so well.

By the time I get home from work, I’m utterly exhausted. It’s tough to stare at the computer screen, my hand can’t remember how to hold a pen, and my eyes suddenly drop if I try to read.

Needless to say, I’ve barely gotten any writing or blogging done since work started. If I didn’t have deadlines for my book reviews, I probably wouldn’t be reading either (and even then I missed a review this month). The only reason I’ve been keeping up with my daily blog posts is because I spent a whole day on my blogs before I started back to work and got the majority of September done.

It sucks because while I absolutely love my jobs, I don’t want to be teaching and babysitting for the rest of my life. I want my career to be writing related. I know that takes time and I’ve been working on it bit by bit, but the waiting game is hard.

I’m trying not to get discouraged, but I know what I want to do with my life. I just can’t get there yet. I’m not trying to be impatient because I know this takes time as well as a lot of hard work, determination, and dedication, but… I don’t know. This was just something I had to get off my chest, I guess.

Sorry if this post seems like such a downer. Let this be a lesson to just stay positive. Even though this post is the complete opposite of yesterday’s post.

rachel poli sign off

Twitter | Tumblr | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double Jump

Musical Mondays: I Will Make It

I’ve decided to start something a little different on here.

I love music. Music is a form of creativity just like writing. So, every once in a while I’ll have a Musical Monday where I discuss a song I love and that has been inspirational to me.

This won’t be a weekly series. I can’t even promise that this will happen every month or even every other month. It’s just something special I’ll share once in a while as new, inspirational songs pop up.

Musical Mondays: I Will Make It by Yungtown featuring Garrett Williamson

Though I can tolerate some songs and artists, I’m not that into rap music. But Kris and I love watching a YouTuber named Yungtown. He talks about video games a lot and he also writes and raps his own songs, which are also about video games.

He’s probably the only rapper that I can truly tolerate and listen to all day long.

He posted a music video a little while ago featuring another great artist, Garrett Williamson.

This song is called, “I Will Make It.” It’s about being who you are, doing what you’re passionate about and what you love. Don’t worry about what other people think of you. You’re amazing and unique.

This song really speaks to me especially because of my writing. Every once in a while, I have one of those days where I don’t think I’ll be able to make it as a writer or my writing isn’t good enough or that everyone else is so much better than me, so why would anyone enjoy my writing?

There are a lot of doubts that go with pursuing a writing career (or any career, really).

I wrote my first novel in 2009 thanks to NaNoWriMo. That’ll be seven years this upcoming November. I’ve been writing original novels for a very long time. And since then, I’ve completed at least five first draft manuscripts along with various poems, short stories, and children’s picture books.

Yet, nothing is ready. I’ve queried a few pieces here and there, entered contests, and nothing has come from any of them.

It takes a lot of time, determination, and hard work. I will get my chance sooner or later. And if I don’t, I’ll keep working at it because I love writing and I love this community that my blog has built over the past few years.

This goes for all of you, too. If you haven’t made it yet, you will. All in due time.

I listen to this song every time I get down about my writing or anything else I’m trying to pursue. It speaks a lot of truth and is a great pick me up.

Below is the music video. The song ends around the 3-minute mark, even though the video itself is about six-and-a-half minutes. Below the video is the lyrics and I’ve bolded my favorite lines.

Enjoy! And I hope the song will have some meaning for you.

Lyrics:

This goes out to the people who are thinking of giving up
Listen up each of you are sounding ridiculous
Get out of the rhythm of living with doubt yes it’s difficult
We cannot allow these articulate

Visions twist what we know clear
When we hold fear, it screams loud making it delectable to listen to
Interesting isn’t it, realism is our best defense
Our foundation so we won’t get disappointed or discontent

Like what’s the point of dreaming big or even trying
You don’t who I am, they won’t care if I quit
My friends are fortunate, talented, and flourishing
I put in so much work, will I ever get my chance?

Look that path is a different one
If you walked that then that is who you’d become
Usually, an opportunity will swoop ruthlessly from our reach
As a reminder to be the best you that you can be

No matter what they say
I’ll still find my way
I’m gonna stand my ground

No matter what they do
I won’t let them get through
Ain’t nothing bringing me down cause

I will I will
I will make it today
Nothing nothing
Nothing will stand in my way
I will I will make it and find the open door

With each measure and task, we develop a path
But instead of glancing ahead we’re stuck rubbernecking our past
conversate with the hatred, concentrate on complaining
Constantly complicating each thought till they’re all entangled

Creating a situation where creating becomes painful
and each operation feels like we’re creatively disabled
and we cradle impatience our priorities decompose
Aligning with complacency our anxiety grows

Redefining our soul solidifying a home
Assembled entirely out of unrecognizable stones
By and by scrutinizing our by-product thoughtfully
Stuck following unconsciously, but do you wanna be a wannabee?

When you can be the one who reaches farther than a lot of these
People who only wanna piece of stardom like astrology
So stop pondering your significance and promise me
you’ll stop comparing yourself especially since are unique

rachel poli sign off

Twitter | Tumblr | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double Jump

Inspiration Station: When and Why Did You Begin Writing? With Topaz Winters

As you know, guest bloggers appear on my site twice a month. For the months of August, September, and October, my guests will be discussing the same topic:

When and why did you begin writing?

This week we’ll learn a little bit more about Topaz Winters. Thanks, Topaz!

Inspiration Station with Topaz Winters: When and Why did you begin writing?

Something Real

It’s like this: there is a fascination I have, an obsession almost, with things that stay the same.

I’m talking about stories, the things that are real, the things that remain when the rest has willed away already to unknowing. Do you ever notice, in this peculiar fast-paced existence of ours, how many things change irrevocably in the quickest, softest moments? This, I have come to believe, is the nature of the universe. How it’s all moving, it’s never the same, you go to bed one night, you wake up the next morning & suddenly your own soul is a stranger, you’re making small talk with the deepest parts of yourself.

I want forever. I want eternity in an impossible, longing way. In a way, I could never hope to find.

I’ve been told this is what makes me a poet. I’ve also been told this is what makes me a sad person. I am not quite sure whether they are one & the same.

But there are enduring things. (And I have to believe this. And I have to remind myself this, my anxious & fast-moving head, this mind of mine that has never understood how to stop wondering, wandering, worrying, say it soft, like—there are some things that stay. There are always things that stay.)

I need those infinities, those rare constants I’ve found so fleeting in this existence. I need stories.

It’s like this:

there was a boy I loved who read me poetry at two in the morning when I was on the verge of a panic attack, and those words stayed long after the boy had drifted away. It’s like this: seven books are stacked high on my nightstand, and they’re all partially read, the way I revel in the reassurance that their contents will not change no matter the terror of the world spinning around them. It’s like this: yesterday I read a book from my childhood & it felt like coming home. It’s like this:

stories stay when nothing else does.

How they are the steadfast glue that holds together our uncertain panging myopic world.

This is a very romantic way of putting the fact that I am bone-deep heart-quake terrified of the piercing unknown. That this terror is natural is, of course, no help at all: I am only human, only like everyone else in feeling scared & alone & weightless in the universe.

See, I fall in love with writing—not just poetry, not just novels, but stories in all of their forms—because it teaches me that not everything is destined to leave. That not everyone is searching for an escape route.

There is nothing fictional about the infinity within the written pages. I treasure things that remain because so few do.

(And say stories like you say compass, like you say little black dress, the deliciousness of night driving, slow-drip honey Sunday mornings, like lucky penny & the boy next door’s cat who is ugly but beautiful if you ask him, say it like you’ll never fall out of love with the person you first kiss, like hopscotch & carousel rides & your grandfather’s homemade milkshakes & the exquisite pleasure of the song on the radio that never seems to be overplayed: that’s what stories are. The inevitability, the permanence of them. Something that never changes in a world that never stops changing.)

I have these fits of panic whenever I don’t write enough, deep in the stomach where the soul lives. I need the reminder of stories, I’ve learned. If I don’t hold onto it, if I don’t harness it & clutch it tight to my chest & whisper to myself, over & over, here is something endless, something real—I’m lost. Adrift in the sea of the ever-flowing universe—how you blink and suddenly the ground beneath your feet is gone.

But here. Take these stories.

And hold them to your chest & feel how they are solid, unshakeable. And let yourself forget the horizon you can never quite touch. And let the stories fill your vision, reach for them as a kind of knowing.

And everything could still change in an instant, and you are not free, and the sky may fall on your head at any moment, and there is no way of knowing the wonder or the terror that lies ahead.

But you can see the stories that stay when all else is left behind. And the stories, the stories, the ever-present stories—they have always been enough. 

Author’s Bio:

Topaz Winters was born in 1999. She writes big poems in small packages. She resides in Singapore, at topazwinters.com, and on Twitter @topazwinters.

Inspiration Station: When and Why Did You Begin Writing? With Herminia Chow

As you know, guest bloggers appear on my site twice a month. For the months of August, September, and October, my guests will be discussing the same topic:

When and why did you begin writing?

This week we’ll learn a little bit more about Herminia Chow. Thanks, Herminia!

Inspiration Station: When and Why did you begin writing? With Herminia Chow by Rachel Poli

Thank you, Rachel, for inviting me to write about writing.

When did you start writing?

I started writing when I learned to pick up a pencil.

I started writing for fun when I was around 12 years old.

I started writing more seriously in high school.

Growing up, I used to read all the time. But I didn’t write much back then. If you asked me when I was a kid whether I’d read and write as much as I do now, I would’ve told you you’re crazy and should go to the doctor to get a check-up.

In elementary, I did better in math than in English for several years. Maybe it’s because my first language is Cantonese. Maybe it’s because math was an easier language to learn so to speak. Maybe it’s because I’m weird.

I used to sit with a girl who could spell much better than I could. And every time I needed to write out a word I didn’t know how to, I asked her. I guess I should thank her. Fortunately, the older I got, the better I could spell. I went from doing quite poorly on spelling quizzes and tests to doing just fine. I guess I should thank myself for reading every night, huh?

I also have to thank my parents for putting up with my trips to the library every few weeks. And later, they would put up with my trips to the bookstore.

At some point, things changed. Right around grade 4 or 5, I think. A teacher recommended I read Bridge to Terabithia. I didn’t have anything better to do, so I did. That book had such a profound effect on me. It’s a book I read forever ago, yet I still remember it. Around that time my grades in Reading and Writing started to change. For the better. I still fell short in Oral Communication. Introvert alert.

I decided I wanted to write a novel in grade 8. 12 years old me must have thought I was too god for fan fiction and short stories. Obviously, I had no idea what I was doing. I couldn’t pull off a short story back then, much less a full-fledged novel. But you live and learn. In retrospect, I have no regrets. I still hope no one ever reads anything I wrote prior to high school, especially that novel. It took me about 2 or 3 years to finish the first draft because I put it away a few times. I guess I just couldn’t wait to create my own characters and worlds. However, when I got into the project, I felt a bit overwhelmed. But the experience is one I will never forget. And if you ask me about my most memorable accomplishment, it’s finishing the first draft of my first novel.

Why did you start writing?

I used to read other people’s work all the time, not just novels but newspaper articles, magazine ads, and everything in between. I loved words. I still do. Reading about fictional characters in fictional worlds inspired me to not only imagine my own but to get them down on paper as well. So I started to do just that. I haven’t looked back since.

Reading and writing were also an escape. I’d be lying if I said I had a perfect, happy childhood. Both allowed me to escape to a different world, if only temporarily.

I write because I can’t imagine myself doing anything else. I don’t know how I would pass the time if I couldn’t create or consume good content.

I don’t always feel like writing, but once I pick up a pen and start putting words down on the page, I usually don’t want to stop. It’s insane to think that the characters and worlds I’ve created didn’t exist before. Isn’t it incredible to think that a blank page could turn into a beautiful story?

I almost always seem to lose track of time too when I’m working on a project. Like right now while writing this post. I can’t say the same for other activities.

Creating something is the best feeling. Getting to share it is the cherry on top.

Once again, thanks Rachel for everything. And thank you for reading. I hope you keep writing!

Author’s bio:

Herminia Chow resides in Canada where she is fond of curling up with good books (and bad ones too), obsessing over her blogs (on WordPress and Tumblr), and coming up with new ideas for stories (or thinking about them). She hopes to major in Book and Media Studies while doing a minor in Writing and Rhetoric. Herminia is a creative writer, a brief blogger, a recreational dancer, and an avid reader of all things.

Connect with Herminia:

WordPress

Tumblr

Goodreads

Facebook

Twitter

Inspiration Station: When and Why Did You Begin Writing? With Charles Yallowitz

Inspiration Station is back, but in a new way!

As you know, guest bloggers appear on my site twice a month. For the months of August, September, and October, my guests will be discussing the same topic:

When and why did you begin writing?

This week we’ll learn a little bit more about Charles Yallowitz. Thanks, Charles!

Inspiration Station: Guest Charles Yallowitz with Rachel Poli

First, thank you to Rachel for asking me to be a part of this guest post series.  I was asked about the when and why behind me being an author.  This is always a fun question to answer and it requires me going back enough years that I feel old.

The when actually goes back to 2nd grade, which might sound like me pulling a fast one on people.  We had learning stations and I loved the writing one because I got to make my own books.  Usually about animals or jokes, but I tried to tell a few stories.  I would do anything I could to stay at that station, which included hiding under it one day to keep working while the math lesson started.  I got in trouble, mistook it for me needing to stop writing, and only told stories when project guidelines allowed it.  Never thought of it as more than a hobby that kept me occupied.

Things changed in 10th grade when I read ‘Book of Lost Swords’ by Fred Saberhagen.  I’d already read some Narnia and all of the big Tolkien books.  I was getting into Dungeons & Dragons too, but this book series triggered a desire to be an author.  You would think I went right to fantasy, but I was big into comics at the time.  So, I designed a story about four young immortals with magic weapons and super powers that protected the universe from a group of evil immortals.  I developed alien species, uniforms, various stories, supporting characters, and created a big world and history for this.  Then, I started college and found that I was more interested in fantasy.  Windemere was created and things kept rolling along after that.  Seems like a sudden jump at the end, but it really did click after I played in a D&D game that was more than hacking and slashing.

As for why I became an author, it’s because I love telling stories.  The creation of characters and worlds that didn’t exist before is exciting.  Not just putting these things on paper, but being able to transform the stories in my head into the minds of readers.  It’s a special world that I love to share with others, especially if it makes them happy or at least less stressed than when they started reading.  I see storytelling and reading as a form of escapism for both the reader and the author.  We get to step out of our skin and into the role of someone else or, at the very least, witness great events beyond the real world’s limits.  For me, this can be rejuvenating for my energy and help me get through a rough period, which is something I’d like my stories to do for others.

This part stems from me using books to relax when I was younger, especially if I had trouble sleeping.  I’d read until I passed out, which is probably why I can only read for 15-30 minutes before I doze off.  It isn’t that I’m bored, but I’ve trained myself to relate reading to sleeping.  My mind kind of wanders off into the story too, so it’s more of a trance at times.  Anyway, this is a big reason why I write.  Not the putting people to sleep thing, but as a way for people to relax and let their real world problems go for even a moment.

About Charles:

Charles Yallowitz was born and raised on Long Island, NY, but he has spent most of his life wandering his own imagination in a blissful haze. Occasionally, he would return from this world for the necessities such as food, showers, and Saturday morning cartoons. One day he returned from his imagination and decided he would share his stories with the world. After his wife decided that she was tired of hearing the same stories repeatedly, she convinced him that it would make more sense to follow his dream of being a fantasy author. So, locked within the house under orders to shut up and get to work, Charles brings you Legends of Windemere. He looks forward to sharing all of his stories with you, and his wife is happy he finally has someone else to play with.

Connect with Charles:

Legends of Windemere Blog
Twitter
Facebook
Website
Amazon Author Page
Goodreads Page

5 Ways to Chase Inspiration

Guest bloggers visit my website twice a month on Tuesday and Thursday. If you would like to be part of this, feel free to check out the Be A Guest Blogger page.

This week’s guest post is brought to you by Nicky. Thanks, Nicky!

It’s a funny thing that when you most need inspiration (remembering you’ve agreed to do a guest post that’s due in an hour for example), that illusive entity of the imagination eludes you.

Artists, in general, all understand how difficult it is to describe inspiration and where they draw it from, but writers, in particular, seem to personify it.

Perhaps it’s because we all struggle with it at some point, or because our self-doubt expresses itself so clearly as a separate personality that our vivid imaginations can easily translate it into something that isn’t us.

Whatever the reason, and no matter how you choose to view inspiration, the general consensus seems to be that it’s not something that should be waited upon.

Inspiration is something that should be sought out, chased after, created. If necessary, it should be wrenched from its hiding place and forced to work for you, instead of against you.

With that in mind, there are several tricks that artists and writers, in particular, can use to generate emergency inspiration.

1. Ask a question. It can be about anything. Something that happened to you, something your character did in the last chapter. Whatever question it is, make sure it’s open-ended and can’t be answered with a yes or no.

2. Chat to other writers. Sometimes a discussion about your current WIP can spark a chain of ideas you never would have thought of. Not all of them will apply, but you’ll more often than not end up with motivation to continue that you didn’t have before.

3. Find writing prompts. The internet is full of wonderful sites that offer writing prompts, and if you need one in a hurry, there are apps available for smartphones as well.

4. Observe. As artists, we often look at the world slightly differently, but we tend to forget that when life swoops in and insists on stealing our time. As writers, in particular, observing life as we experience it, gives us a wonderful selection of material to use for inspiration.

5. Just write. Even if you’re 100% certain that it’s going to be useless, write it. We may personify inspiration, believing it to be an uncooperative brat, but at the end of the day, no one likes to be ignored and if you ignore that sulking muse, waiting for it to creep up and offer apologies on a silver platter of ideas… You’ll have a long, long, wait ahead of you.

Instead, write as often as possible, whether you feel it’s good, bad or just plain awful. Because every time you write, it’s like taking inspiration out for ice cream and making it fall a little bit deeper in love with you.

Everyone knows that when you’re in love, you want to spend every moment together, so naturally, you’ll never lack inspiration again. Until the time for your next blog post comes round, anyway.

You can find Nicky on her website.

Keep the Inspiration Flowing

Guest bloggers visit my website twice a month on Tuesday and Thursday. If you would like to be part of this, feel free to check out the Be A Guest Blogger page.

This week’s guest post is brought to you by my sister Kris. Thanks, Kris!

My cousin and I were talking about reading and writing the other night. She’s a preteen entertaining the idea of writing like Rachel and myself, and we were talking about working even when not motivated.

I quoted Jack London: “You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”

Which is probably something I should do. I tend to find my mind wandering away from my writing when I’m trying to put words on paper. Half the time it’s regarding a different part of the story or a different story altogether.

There are plenty of ways to keep focused while writing. One of my favorite ways is sticking on some music. Instrumental seems to help, but I’m also partial to lyrical music as well, especially if the song shares the same energy as the scene I’m currently writing.

If I’m stuck on a particular scene in a story, I switch it up. I dive into another scene, perhaps one that I’ve been looking forward to writing. Maybe I’ll start over on the scene I was stuck on and take it in an entirely different direction.

Exercise and taking a brief break helps the creative muscles as well. Move away from the computer screen or notebook and take the puppy for a walk. One of the best times to write a story is in your mind when you’re doing other things!

My cousin seemed to get a taste of how much dedication one needed in order to write a book. Here’s hoping that she was determined, rather than daunted, in pursuing that dream!

Kristen Poli is a young woman in her mid-twenties who is obsessed with writing, video games, dogs, and chocolate. She’s always up for meeting others who share her obsessions, so feel free to say hello over at her social media.

If you would like to know more about Kris, visit her on her social media:

Blog | Goodreads | Tumblr | Twitter

5 Quotes by Dr. Seuss

quotes by dr. seuss rachel poli

1. “I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living.”

2. “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

3. “Only you can control your future.”

4. “Be awesome! Be a book nut!”

5. “So the writer who breeds more words than he needs is making a chore for the reader who reads.”

rachel poli sign off

Twitter | Tumblr | Pinterest | GoodReads