Kitty Hawk And The Hunt For Hemingway’s Ghost By Iain Reading [Book Review]

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Book Review: Kitty Hawk and the Hunt for Hemingway's Ghost by Iain Reading | Young adult | Mystery | RachelPoli.com

I received a free digital copy of this book from the author’s publicist in exchange for an honest review.

Summary:

Kitty Hawk and the Hunt for Hemingway’s Ghost is the exciting second installment in a new series of adventure mystery stories that are one part travel, one part history and five parts adventure. This second book in the series continues the adventures of Kitty Hawk, an intrepid teenage pilot who has decided to follow in the footsteps of her hero Amelia Earhart and make an epic flight around the entire world. After flying across North America Kitty’s journey takes her down south to Florida where she plans to get a bit of rest and relaxation before continuing on with the rest of her long and grueling flight. As Kitty explores the strange and magical water world of the Florida Keys her knack for getting herself into precarious situations sweeps her headlong into the adventure of a lifetime involving mysterious lights, ancient shipwrecks, razor-toothed barracudas and even a sighting of the great Ernest Hemingway himself. This exhilarating story will have armchair explorers and amateur detectives alike anxiously following every twist and turn as they are swept across the landscape and history of the Florida Keys all the way from Key West to the strange and remarkable world of Fort Jefferson and the Dry Tortugas.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

I enjoy this cover because it has little bits and pieces of what happens throughout the story. Each object on the cover is in the book and it’s almost as though the cover itself is a picture summary. The colors are bright and pretty, and while I like the font of the title, it is a little hard to read, especially with its size.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

I read the first book in the series and enjoyed it. So, when I was approached to read this one, I said yes.

Plot | RachelPoli.com

Kitty has found herself in the middle of yet another mystery. Starting where we left off in the previous book, she has begun her trip around the world. She lands in Florida and learns a lot about Ernest Hemingway, including coming across his “ghost.”

She ends up in the middle of something much deeper (yes, that was a pun). I thought it was well done and everything tied together nicely. I think I enjoyed this one more than the first.

Characters | RachelPoli.com

I’ve come to realize Kitty gets herself into these messes because she’s extremely nosy. It reminds me a little of Nancy Drew. It works, though none of this would happen if Kitty just went on her merry way. She still has conversations with herself which still bothers me. However, it wasn’t as overbearing as the first book so it made the reading easier.

She meets Jack and Jodi, a couple who sort of take Kitty under their wing as she goes on her vacation in Florida before her long trip. I enjoyed their characters and what they brought to the table.

I even liked James, the tour guide, and wish he was in it a little more.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

This mystery is easy to follow along yet it’s not so easy to figure out. I was intrigued from the moment Kitty seemed to have found Hemingway’s ghost in the beginning and couldn’t figure out what it was. The history wasn’t overbearing and I feel like I actually learned something, geography included, and even about Hemingway himself.

Overall | RachelPoli.com

This is an enjoyable read. It’s entertaining, educational, and a fairly quick read. If you enjoy light mysteries and young adult, try this one out.

Kitty Hawk and the Hunt for Hemingway’s Ghost by Iain Reading gets…
Book Review Rating System | 4 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com4 out of 5 cups

Favorite Quote:

“And so it went, my imagination running wild and jumping from one absurd explanation to the next until I finally fell asleep.” –Iain Reading, Kitty Hawk and the Hunt for Hemingway’s Ghost

Buy the book:

Amazon

About the Author:

Iain Reading | Kitty Hawk and the Yukon Gold | Book Review | YA Mystery | Historical Fiction | RachelPoli.comIain Reading is passionate about Root Beer, music, and writing. He is Canadian, but currently resides in the Netherlands working for the United Nations.

Iain is the author of the Kitty Hawk Flying Detective Agency Series, The Wizards of Waterfire Series, and the dragon of the month club. To learn more, go to his Amazon page.

Readers can connect with Iain on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and if you enjoyed this post, please share it around!

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An Abundance Of Katherines By John Green [Book Review]

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Book Review: Abundance of Katherines by John Green | Reading | Young Adult | Fiction | RachelPoli.com

I borrowed the book from my cousin.

Summary:

Katherine V thought boys were gross
Katherine X just wanted to be friends
Katherine XVIII dumped him in an e-mail
K-19 broke his heart

When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type happens to be girls named Katherine. And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped. Nineteen times, to be exact.

On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washed-up child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight, Judge Judy-loving best friend riding shotgun–but no Katherines. Colin is on a mission to prove The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship, avenge Dumpees everywhere, and finally win him the girl.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

I really like the cover. I’m a fan of the colors and showing the lot of girls, it fits nicely with the title. I didn’t understand the math equation at first but it made more sense after I had read the book.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

I’ve been slowly going through books written by John Green. This was my third book by him. My cousin had it and read it for a school project. Before I could ask to borrow it, she asked me to read it so I could later help her with the project in case she needed it.

Plot | RachelPoli.com

Colin is depressed because his girlfriend, Katherine, has dumped him. This is the 19th time he’s dated and been dumped by a girl named Katherine. In order to help him get out of his funk, his friend, Hassan, and him go on a road trip.

While this plot idea wasn’t bad, it felt too unrealistic to me. I know it’s YA, but I was expect Colin to be a little older. How has he dated 19 girls in his life already when he’s just in high school? I love a good road trip novel as much as the next, but I wasn’t interested in anything they were doing.

In theory, this wasn’t a bad idea, but I think more could have been done with it. I felt as though nothing happened in this book.

Characters | RachelPoli.com

I think the hardest part for me about this novel was the characters. I didn’t like any of them. Colin wasn’t a great protagonist because he was just “woe is me” the entire time. He was full of himself in a way because it was almost as though no one was good enough for him unless her name was Katherine.

Hassan kept using “slang” words but he wasn’t actually swearing most of the time and that got real old real fast. The dialogue wasn’t enjoyable at all.

They meet a girl on their trip who Colin takes a liking to, but she was pretty bland to me. She was nice to Colin and Hassan but she didn’t do too much throughout.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

As always, John Green has a way with words. I enjoy his writing style and the book flowed well and was easy to it. It was language and tone of the characters that really bothered me. I felt as though I was constantly rolling my eyes. It was because of that it just wasn’t as enjoyable to me.

Overall | RachelPoli.com

Overall, not much happened in this book. Colin learns his lesson, but it’s an annoying process to get there. Despite that, none of the characters really developed at all and there were no tense moments. I won’t be giving this book another read.

An Abundance of Katherines by John Green gets…
Book Review Rating System | 2 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com 2 out of 5 cups

Favorite Quote:

“What is the point of being alive if you don’t at least try to do something remarkable?” –John Green, An Abundance of Katherines

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and if you enjoyed this post, please share it around!

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Kitty Hawk And The Curse Of The Yukon Gold By Iain Reading [Book Review]

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through these links I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks so much for your support!

Book Review | Kitty Hawk and the Curse of the Yukon Gold by Iain Reading | RachelPoli.com

I have received a free digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Summary:

After leaving her home in the western Canadian fishing village of Tofino to spend the summer in Alaska studying humpback whales Kitty finds herself caught up in an unforgettable adventure involving stolen gold, devious criminals, ghostly shipwrecks, and bone-chilling curses. Kitty’s adventure begins with the lingering mystery of a sunken ship called the Clara Nevada and as the plot continues to unfold this spirited story will have armchair explorers and amateur detectives alike anxiously following every twist and turn as they are swept along through the history of the Klondike Gold Rush to a suspenseful final climatic chase across the rugged terrain of Canada’s Yukon, the harsh land made famous in the stories and poems of such writers as Jack London, Robert Service and Pierre Berton. It is a riveting tale that brings to glorious life the landscape and history of Alaska’s inside passage and Canada’s Yukon, as Kitty is caught up in an epic mystery set against the backdrop of the scenery of the Klondike Gold Rush.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

I love this book cover. It perfectly sums up some major events of the book – the plane, Kitty climbing the mountain, the whale in the background – and the art style is just great. I love looking at it and it certainly enticed me in.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

I was approached by the author’s publicist about this book. I love mysteries and was intrigued by the “historical fiction” part of this story. I’ll admit, I probably wouldn’t have picked it up on my own, but I decided to give it a try.

Plot | RachelPoli.com

Kitty Hawk goes on an adventure flying off in her plane to Alaska in order to watch whales, observe, and study them. Then she runs into a group of gold thieves. She overhears their plan and they catch her before she can run away. Her mission is no longer whales, it’s the gold.

I felt as though this book was slow to start. I didn’t really get interested in it until Kitty ran into the thieves and that was around 100 pages or so into the story. When that happened, I got really into it. I felt as though the plot was cleverly crafted into the story making the history important, but not bombarding me with a history lesson.

Characters | RachelPoli.com

I enjoyed Kitty’s character. She was a strong protagonist and certainly knew how to take care of herself. However, a good chunk of her dialogue, especially in the beginning, was her talking to her internal self. It got confusion since her thoughts were in normal quotations and I also didn’t think it made any sense. She was having actual conversations with herself. It became annoying and I didn’t think it was needed.

Once I met Charlie, Buck, Will, and Jay, I enjoyed their characters a lot more. The four brothers were certainly a great addition to the cast. Though, I wonder if all four were needed. Their personalities were certainly different from each other.

However, Jay was the silent type. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it was almost as though he wasn’t even there. He didn’t start really speaking until the main part of their journey was halfway over. I had completely forgotten about him to the point that when his name was stated I had no idea who he was.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

This story flowed well. As stated earlier, I felt as though the beginning was slow, but it did pick up when the adventure truly began. Once that happened it was smooth sailing. The history lessons were minimum but I learned a lot anyway.

I enjoyed all the description of their adventure, though a lot of the dialogue felt unrealistic to me. A lot of dialogue didn’t contain any contractions making the characters sound almost robotic. It just didn’t seem like something a person would say in real life.

Overall | RachelPoli.com

Overall, this was a great read. Once you get past the beginning it’s an enjoyable read. If you like a casual mystery and have a taste for adventure, give this one a try.

Kitty Hawk and the Curse of the Yukon Gold by Iain Reading gets…
Book Review Rating System | 4 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com4 out of 5 cups

Favorite Quote:

“Apparently even in deadly serious situations boys simply can’t resist the urge to play like they are secret agents or something.” –Iain Reading, Kitty Hawk and the Curse of the Yukon Gold

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

About The Series

Kitty Hawk and the Curse of the Yukon Gold is a perfect book to fire the imagination of readers of all ages. Filled with fascinating and highly Google-able locations and history this book will inspire anyone to learn and experience more for themselves.

There are currently five books in the Kitty Hawk Flying Detective Agency Series: Kitty Hawk and the Curse of the Yukon Gold (book 1), Kitty Hawk and the Hunt for Hemingway’s Ghost (book 2), Kitty Hawk and the Icelandic Intrigue (book 3), and Kitty Hawk and the Tragedy of the RMS Titanic (book 4), and Kitty Hawk and the Mystery of the Masterpieces (book 5).

“In the Kitty Hawk Flying Detective Agency Series the heroine finds herself in a new geographic location in each book. The series will eventually have a total of 13 books in it (maybe more) and her flight around the world will be completed in the end,” says Iain. “The books are sequential but one could definitely read any of the later ones before reading the earlier ones.”

For more information, go to Kitty Hawk World

Check out the book trailer: YouTube

About the Author:

Iain Reading | Kitty Hawk and the Yukon Gold | Book Review | YA Mystery | Historical Fiction | RachelPoli.comIain Reading is passionate about Root Beer, music, and writing. He is Canadian, but currently resides in the Netherlands working for the United Nations.

Iain is the author of the Kitty Hawk Flying Detective Agency Series, The Wizards of Waterfire Series, and the dragon of the month club. To learn more, go to his Amazon page.

Readers can connect with Iain on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Have you read this book? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below, I’d love to chat!

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Once And For All By Sarah Dessen [Book Review]

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through these links I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks so much for your support!

Once and for All by Sarah Dessen | Book Review | Young adult romance | RachelPoli.com

I bought this book at Barnes & Noble.

Summary:

As bubbly as champagne and delectable as wedding cake, Once and for All, Sarah Dessen’s thirteenth novel, is set in the world of wedding planning, where crises are routine.

Louna, daughter of famed wedding planner Natalie Barrett, has seen every sort of wedding: on the beach, at historic mansions, in fancy hotels and clubs. Perhaps that’s why she’s cynical about happily-ever-after endings, especially since her own first love ended tragically. When Louna meets charming, happy-go-lucky serial dater Ambrose, she holds him at arm’s length. But Ambrose isn’t about to be discouraged, now that he’s met the one girl he really wants.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

This book is all about weddings, so having a subtle person throwing flowers into the air was certainly a nice touch. It’s a simple cover, yet it tells a lot about what the book may entail. I especially love the background color and, like all of Dessen’s books, the title, and author name pop out nicely and are large enough to be seen.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

While I haven’t read all of Dessen’s books like most people, I’m trying to catch up. This is the author’s latest book and I grabbed it as soon as I could to keep up with the times. It didn’t disappoint.

Plot | RachelPoli.com

I felt as though this plot was a bit cliche. Louna works with her mother planning and working weddings but she doesn’t date herself. She doesn’t really believe in love. Then her mother hires Ambrose, an interesting character. Of course, Louna is distant toward him but Ambrose keeps trying. I’m sure you can already tell what’s going to happen.

Still, Dessen did it right. Louna carries baggage from a past boyfriend which heats things up a bit.

Characters | RachelPoli.com

I enjoyed all the characters. Louna made a great female lead and while Ambrose was annoying at first, he grew on me.

Louna’s mother was also a great character. She was the perfect mother figure but she and Louna had a good relationship with each other which made me feel good.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

This book is a decent length with some lengthy chapters. It all flows well and reads easily. It’s got a good pace and can be a quick read but you want to take your time with it.

Overall | RachelPoli.com

Dessen didn’t disappoint. If you enjoy a little romance, but not over-the-top romance, and like young adult, check out this book. Or any of Dessen’s books.

Once and for All by Sarah Dessen gets…
Book Review Rating System | 5 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com5 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“Everyone’s always in their own world, when it’s still an option.” –Sarah Dessen, Once and for All

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Have you read this book? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below, I’d love to chat!

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Eliza And Her Monsters By Francesca Zappia [Book Review]

*This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through these links I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks so much for your support!

Eliza and her Monsters by Francesca Zappia | Book Review | YA Fiction | Young Adult | RachelPoli.com

I bought this book myself at my local Barnes & Noble.

Summary:

Her story is a phenomenon. Her life is a disaster.

In the real world, Eliza Mirk is shy, weird, and friendless. Online, she’s LadyConstellation, the anonymous creator of the wildly popular webcomic Monstrous Sea. Eliza can’t imagine enjoying the real world as much as she loves the online one, and she has no desire to try.

Then Wallace Warland, Monstrous Sea’s biggest fanfiction writer, transfers to her school. Wallace thinks Eliza is just another fan, and as he draws her out of her shell, she begins to wonder if a life offline might be worthwhile.

But when Eliza’s secret is accidentally shared with the world, everything she’s built—her story, her relationship with Wallace, and even her sanity—begins to fall apart.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

The book cover is what caught my attention. It matches perfectly with the contents of the story. The cover shows a pair of hands, assuming to be Eliza’s, holding onto a pair of characters. The font of the title suggests something artsy as well. I love the design overall.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

I had seen this book making its way around the WordPress book world. I had heard a lot of great things. I do enjoy storytellings and creating characters, of course, so when I went to Barnes & Noble I picked it up.

Plot | RachelPoli.com

Eliza Mirk is a creative writer who publishes a comic online. She has created a brand new world with amazing characters and wonderful settings. Her username, Lady Constellation, is practically famous on the internet. However, she doesn’t want anyone to know it’s actually her.

This plot is unique as it relates so well to today. Everyone “knows” who everyone is on the internet and a lot of people make their living online now. Eliza was making money off of merch and that was going to help pay for her college. She was doing what she loved to do but didn’t want the fame attached to it. I found myself really into the plot, especially when she met a real-life fan because I knew what was coming.

Characters | RachelPoli.com

I enjoyed reading Eliza’s story. Eliza and Lady Constellation differ so much from each other which I thought was spot on. We’re all a little different on the internet. She made a great protagonist and developed well throughout the story.

Wallace was a great male lead. I was able to predict what was going to happen when he came into the picture, but I still enjoyed him and the dynamic between him and Eliza.

Eliza had two mods online, both varied in ages and they lived in different parts of the world. They only communicated online and through text but I loved their relationship with each other. They met through Monstruous Sea, but they were great friends.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

The story flowed well overall. It bounced back and forth between narrative to text layout to brief drawings and blurbs of Monstrous Sea. I never felt jarred out of the story and it was easy to read. In fact, I read half the book late at night because I couldn’t stop reading.

Overall | RachelPoli.com

This was a wonderful story. I think most of us can relate to it. The storytelling overall is great and I would love to see more.

Eliza And Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia gets…
Book Review Rating System | 4 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com 4 out of 5 cups of coffee

Favorite Quote:

“It’s stupid because that’s what I like about the internet – that it gives you time to think about what you want to say before you say it.” –Francesca Zappia, Eliza And Her Monsters

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Have you read this book? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below, I’d love to chat!

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Turtles All The Way Down By John Green [Book Review]

Turtles All The Way Down by John Green | Book Review | Young Adult Fiction | RachelPoli.com

Summary:

Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis.

Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

The cover for Green’s latest novel is simple. I like the orange coloring of the spiral as it’s not too bright and doesn’t take away from the actual title. The title and Green’s name takes up a lot of space on the cover is in a semi-messy font which goes well with the premise of the story as well. I like it.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

I’ve hopped on the John Green train late. Before picking this up, I’ve only ever read Paper Towns by him. His books have always been on my list so when this one was announced, I preordered it right away.

Plot | RachelPoli.com

This plot did not turn out the way I had expected it to. I expected more of a mystery, but it turned out to be more about finding yourself and being true to yourself and your friends. It was about being there for one another. While it wasn’t what I expected it to be, it was still a fun read with a cool mystery in the background.

Characters | RachelPoli.com

Part of the reason I enjoyed this novel so much was that Aza is just like me. She’s more extreme than me, but she has anxiety and some of the things she did and said are some things I can relate to. She made a great protagonist and was good fodder to through into a mystery.

Daisy, Aza’s best friend, was a good character to balance Aza out. She was supportive of her friend but got annoyed with her at times. Still, she was a fun character and I would love to see her in another story.

Davis, their other friend who wasn’t their friend in the beginning, was interesting. It was his father who went missing, his money that Aza and Daisy – mostly Daisy – wanted. Aza and Davis related to each other on so many levels and I found it to be a great dynamic.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

John Green’s writing is always phenomenal. The story was nicely paced and flowed well. There were no stones unturned. The plot was enjoyable enough that it was a quick read and kept me wanting more. While this is a standalone novel, I’d be interested to see these characters in a sequel.

Overall | RachelPoli.com

John Green didn’t disappoint. The plot was intriguing, I fell in love with the characters, and I couldn’t put it down. I would highly recommend this.

Turtles All The Way Down by John Green gets…
Book Review Rating System | 5 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com 5 out of 5

Favorite Quote:

“I wanted to tell her that I was getting better, because that was supposed to be the narrative of illness: It was a hurdle you jumped over, or a battled you won. Illness is a story told in the past.” –John Green, Turtles All The Way Down

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Abe Books

Have you read this book? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below, I’d love to chat!

 

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Eleanor And The Impossible By M. Miles [Book Review]

Title: Eleanor and the Impossible
Author: M. Miles
Published: 
October 30, 2017
Genre: Young adult
How I got the book: I received a free digital ARC from the author in exchange for an honest review

Summary:

Eleanor’s world is confined by the hedge around my guardian’s estate, but her imagination knows no boundaries.

Applying her scientific spirit to her favorite fairy tales, Eleanor devotes years to designing experiments that she hopes will attract fairies to her garden. But when a skeptical boy, instead of a fairy, appears in the garden, Eleanor’s concept of magic is shaken to the core.

The beauty of innocence, the perils of devotion, and the power of imagination are illuminated in a story that sings to the inner child: Eleanor’s story.

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

When the author approached me about this book, I was happy to see the imaginative elements in the story. From the summary alone, I had a feeling the story would be magical. Needless to say, I was intrigued.

rp-plot

Eleanor is an orphan adopted by Lady Fitzopul, a mysterious woman. She hires a nanny, Clara Abbey, to care for the child in every way possible. Eleanor grows up happily, but isolated and unaware of the outside world. Mr. von Due, the man who took care of Eleanor’s adoption, forbids her to go out as she had speech delays and is a peculiar girl. However, he has another plan up his sleeve.

While I found the beginning of the novel to be a bit slow, the more I read the more I was intrigued. I was thrown into Eleanor’s magical world through her best friend, Maggie, who made up stories and lies to share with Eleanor, who naively thought they were real.

Along comes Theo, a boy Eleanor’s age who Mr. von Due adopted himself. Theo’s goal is to woo Eleanor to gain her fortune. Theo is naturally kind at heart and realizes pretty quickly what a bad idea it is.

In a way, this plot is like a real fairy tale. Eleanor is waiting for her prince to come, not knowing that he doesn’t exist – or, not in the way she thinks.

This plot was cleverly crafted and told a wonderful story. While I was confused by Maggie’s words at first (even I wasn’t sure what was real and what wasn’t), I was soon sucked in.

rp-characters

Eleanor is a naive, sweet young lady. She was adopted at a young age not knowing what happened to her parents or why until Maggie threw ideas into her head. She grew up believing in a magical world where fairies were hiding somewhere. She was the perfect protagonist for such a story and her character developed very nicely.

Maggie, however, was probably my favorite character. Eleanor took a liking to Maggie at a young age and Maggie found that as an opportunity. Maggie wasn’t happy with her life and, wanting to tell stories for a living, she spun a web of tales for Eleanor who believed every word. You could argue Maggie was an antagonist in some way, but she was lonely. I think it got to a point where she wanted to tell Eleanor the truth but was afraid to.

Theo was a wonderful character as well. All he wanted to do was make the others around him happy. He wanted to make his new father, Mr. von Due happy, but when he met Eleanor he realized there was much more to her. He was sweet even to Maggie.

Clara Abbey, Lady Fitozpul, Mr. von Due, Mrs. von Due, and Edward (Mr. and Mrs. von Due’s biological son) were all great supporting characters as well. I could go on about them, but for the sake of the length of this review, I won’t.

rp-writing-style

This book was written in third-person omniscient. This isn’t my favorite because I feel as though there’s more telling than showing. We see everyone’s points of views and thoughts and I don’t care to know about everyone. I’d rather know the protagonist and then infer about everyone else.

The author had such a way with words though that it didn’t bother me as much as it usually does. The description was spot on and the way Maggie told her stories, her voice, was mesmerizing.

rp-overall

I wasn’t too sure about the novel when I first started reading, but the author surprised me in more ways than one. This kind of plot isn’t something I would normally pick up myself if I found it at the bookstore, but I’m glad I gave it a chance. I look forward to any other work M. Miles puts out there.

Eleanor and the Impossible by M. Miles gets…
5-Star Rating | Book Review 5 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“Maybe, then, magic is just the unexplained. And if you hang on to your curiosity, and you hang on to your sense of wonder, maybe there will always be magic in the world for you.” –M. Miles, Eleanor and the Impossible

About M. Miles

M. Miles is a young writer from the foothills of the Smoky Mountains. Like Eleanor, she enjoys the beauty of the natural world and the grandeur of a story well told.

Despite having studied biology in college, Miles has gone on to work as an English teacher, a content writer, and a novel editor. Eleanor and the Impossible is her debut novel. To keep up with new works in progress, visit mmilesblog.wordpress.com.

Buy the book:

Amazon

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Keepers By Sacha de Black [Book Review]

Keepers by Sacha de Black Book Review

Title: Keepers (The Eden East #1)
Author: Sacha de Black
Published: 
November 17, 2017
Genre: Young adult, science fiction
How I got the book: I received a free digital review copy in exchange for an honest review

Summary:

Eden’s life is balanced…
…until her soul is bound to her enemy.

When her parents are murdered, the realm of Trutinor is threatened. Then a mysterious human arrives and changes everything.

As Eden’s world spirals out of control, she doesn’t need a charismatic Siren from her past returning to complicate life.

Now, saving Trutinor is the last thing on Eden’s mind.

Three boys.
Two murdered parents.
One deadly choice.

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

I have been following Sacha on her blog and social media for some time now. I’ve read and followed her through every update this book and I can’t believe the time has finally come – it is out in the world. Sacha approached me to advance read this book and I was more than happy to accept.

rp-plot

Keepers has the most unique plot I’ve seen in a while. The world is fleshed out to the max and the characters are super important in their own way.

We follow Eden East as she tries to do right in her world, Trutinor. Everything changes when her parents are murdered, her soul is bound to not one, but two boys. One of those boys being her enemy and neither of them being the man she truly loves. Then it’s a race against time to fix their binding and Balance their souls once more.

It’s hard to explain only because this world was so cleverly crafted and the rules are complicated (but they’re easy to understand within the pages). A lot of worldbuilding went into this book and it certainly shows. The plot revolves around Keepers, Fallons, Shifters, etc., with the occasional human sprinkled in. While I would not want to be in Eden’s shoes, the world of Trutinor seems like an interesting place.

There was a good amount of romance thrown in, as once you’re Bound your soulmates. You may not be Bound to who you love. That called for a perfect opportunity for a love triangle. I’m not a big fan of romance or love triangles, but it was well done in this story and I found rooting for one guy over the other.

rp-characters

I loved each and every character. They all fulfilled a certain role and no talent was wasted.

Eden made a great protagonist. I loved her voice and her strong will. I felt that she had a nice balance of being “tough” and “vulnerable” at the same time.

Victor made a nice antagonist. Though I have to admit, even though we were meant to hate him, I actually liked his character in the beginning… then I hated him.

Trey made a great supporting character as did Bo, Kato, and everyone else in the story. It was a great cast of characters.

rp-writing-style

This book was written in the third person limited through Eden. I felt that was a good choice for the narrator for this kind of novel.

The pace was smooth, yet it was action-packed. It sped up and slowed down at the right moments. I never got lost in the reading as it was easy to understand and it flowed well.

There’s a lot of learning as you read this novel. It’s a big world with many new terms, but it’s easy enough to stay caught up.

rp-overall

I don’t read a lot of science fiction or even this kind of fantasy for that matter, but I can very easily see myself getting sucked up in this world. The ending had a great twist. I’m really looking forward to the sequel.

Keepers (The Eden East #1) by Sacha de Black gets…
5-Star Rating | Book Review 5 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“Scars are memories. They’re real. Moments we shouldn’t forget.” –Sacha de Black, Keepers

Buy the book:

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Warcross by Marie Lu [Book Review]

Warcross by Marie Lu

Title: Warcross
Author: Marie Lu
Published: 
September 2017 by G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers
Genre: Young adult, science fiction
How I got the book: I bought it

Summary:

For the millions who log in every day, Warcross isn’t just a game—it’s a way of life. The obsession started ten years ago and its fan base now spans the globe, some eager to escape from reality and others hoping to make a profit. Struggling to make ends meet, teenage hacker Emika Chen works as a bounty hunter, tracking down players who bet on the game illegally. But the bounty hunting world is a competitive one, and survival has not been easy. Needing to make some quick cash, Emika takes a risk and hacks into the opening game of the international Warcross Championships—only to accidentally glitch herself into the action and become an overnight sensation.

Convinced she’s going to be arrested, Emika is shocked when instead she gets a call from the game’s creator, the elusive young billionaire Hideo Tanaka, with an irresistible offer. He needs a spy on the inside of this year’s tournament in order to uncover a security problem . . . and he wants Emika for the job. With no time to lose, Emika’s whisked off to Tokyo and thrust into a world of fame and fortune that she’s only dreamed of. But soon her investigation uncovers a sinister plot, with major consequences for the entire Warcross empire.

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

If I remember correctly, this book was recommended to me by Nthato long before the book was released. It intrigued me and I put it on my Goodreads wish eventually forgetting about it. But I saw it in the bookstore the other day and I immediately remembered the book because of the cover. So I grabbed it. And I have to say, I haven’t read a book this fast in a while, it was that good.

rp-plot

Emika Chen is an 18-year-old bounty hunter. She is also an excellent hacker and certainly knows her way around computers and technology. So, when she accidentally hacks into one of the biggest virtual reality games, Warcross, during a live match, she assumes she’s in big trouble.

However, Hideo Tanaka, the 21-year-old creator of Warcross, offers her a job instead.

Emi is hired as a bounty hunter to go undercover in the games and hack into it to find and catch another hacker, only known as Zero. Between her skills and Hideo’s, they work together to catch the unknown man… or woman.

Books about hacking into video games are not uncommon. However, this plot was woven so intricately that it really made it its own. There’s hacking, there’s video game playing, there’s romance (eh), there’s humor, there are dangerous moments… it’s a roller coaster.

While I did figure out who Zero was fairly easily before Zero’s real identity was revealed, there was a twist at the end that I certainly didn’t see coming. And it was the best twist I’ve ever seen in a book.

But I’ll stop talking about the plot now. I could talk about it all day and I know I’ll spoil something…

rp-characters

I found all the characters to be likable in some way or another. Emi was a great protagonist and had a humorous personality. I could relate to her a lot.

Hideo was a great character as well. However, he was just okay for me. He was nice, smart, polite, but I don’t know. Something was off for me, but I did still enjoy him as a character. And I think he was the perfect fit to play the “21-year-old genius.”

The side characters, such as Emi’s Warcross team, Asher, Ren, Roshan, and Hammie, were cool as well. They each had their own unique personalities and contributed in one way or another. It showed their friendship with one another and they each had one goal in mind – to win Warcross. Still, they considered Emi a friend and was willing to help her own in any way they could.

Then there’s Keira. And here’s my only complaint about this book. Keira was Emi’s roommate back in New York, when they were poor and about to get evicted, before Emi accidentally hacked into the game. Once Emi is hired, she flies to Tokyo leaving Keira behind. She’s never heard from again.

I know she was a minor character, but I did like her, and I would assume that she would at least text Emi to see how things were going. Especially since Emi was blasted all over the news a couple of times. There seemed close enough friends that I was hoping they’d keep in touch. If Keira really wasn’t needed, she shouldn’t have been in the book at all.

rp-writing-style

The book is written in Emi’s first-person point of view. We see everything she sees and knows everything she knows, especially her thoughts. She had a humorous personality which definitely made her a fun character to follow around. It made the narration easier to read.

There was a lot of description in this book mostly of the Warcross game and overall world and all the technology that came with it. It was interesting and it honestly makes me wonder if we’re going to have something similar to that in real life at some point. It reminded me of VR Super Smash Brothers.

But it wasn’t just a came. It was a way people communicated with each other as well. It was very well done.

rp-overall

Can you tell I liked the book? I could gush about it all day if you’d let me. It was well written with a twisty plot and fun characters. I’m looking forward to book two.

Warcross by Marie Lu gets…
5-Star Rating | Book Review 5 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“Death has a terrible habit of cutting straight through every careful line you’ve drawn between your present and your future.” –Marie Lu, Warcross

Buy the book:

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