Why Journaling Might Be The Key To Overcoming Your Writing Fears [Guest Post]

It’s my pleasure to welcome Kleia Paluca to my blog. This Inspiration Station is brought to you by her. Thanks, Kleia!

Inspiration Station: Why Journaling May Be The Key To Overcoming Your Writing Fears | Writing Fears | Creative Writing | Guest Post | RachelPoli.com

Many writers struggle at the beginning of their writing journey and never get past the first hurdle: the act of overcoming the blank page in front of them.

Fortunately, there’s an ancient art that can help authors face this writing fear, and it’s called journaling. The Harvard Business Review once said that the key to becoming an outstanding leader is simply to keep a journal. Well, the same truth holds for all writers — and we’ll show you exactly why in this post.

1. Journaling helps you practice writing consistently

To produce a book, you need to get in the habit of writing. This might seem like an oversimplification, but many bestselling authors have said that writing regularly — especially when you don’t feel like you’re writing particularly well — is the most important thing that they’ve done to overcome writer’s block. Maya Angelou is famously on record for saying that she might even jot down, “The cat sat on the mat, that is that, not a rat,” just to be able to put something down on paper.

In this respect, journaling is one of the best ways to practice regular writing. For authors, it can help build a good habit of writing daily (and personal character). Stuck for several days untangling a plot thread in your story? Write in your journal. You might be surprised at how the simple act of writing will benefit your storytelling.

2. It gets the creative gears in your head cranking

Multiple studies have confirmed that journaling will inspire creativity. And perhaps the most freeing thing about journaling is that you can journal about anything. If you’d rather not write about your day, perhaps you can instead describe a recent encounter that you had — in the third person! Or you can practice character creation by plucking a name from a character name generator and building a fun backstory around it. Or you can recall that conversation that you heard earlier that day in the coffee shop and expand upon it, wherever your imagination leads you.

Writing prompts in particular are a great (and readily available) source of inspiration that can get you started. In short, you’re asking the wrong question if you’re asking, “But what should I journal about?” What you want to be inquiring instead is, “What should I journal about first?”

3. It encourages mindfulness

As the old adage goes, a healthy writer is a productive writer. Stress and self-doubt can weigh you (and your words) down, which is why it’s important to try and keep these two horsemen of the apocalypse at bay as best as you can.

It’s important to note that journaling has been found to have long-term benefits for mental health. As Natalie Goldberg once said, “Whether you’re keeping a journal or writing as a meditation, it’s the same thing. What’s important is you’re having a relationship with your mind.” Taking the time every day to journal will keep you keep in touch with your mind and thoughts. It can help turn a negative mindset into a positive one. More than that, it encourages mindfulness, which will benefit you not just as a writer, but as a person.

4. It makes sure that you don’t forget a story idea again

If you’re an author, aspiring or not, you’re probably familiar with this common writing fear: coming up with a really good story idea, promising yourself that you’ll actually remember it this time, and then forgetting it — all in the span of a day.

So, last but not least, a journal can help you recall important ideas. It’s no coincidence, either, that research has found that journaling actually boosts your ability to remember! So you can start saying goodbye to days where you forget a thousand story ideas, so long as you have your journal nearby and handy.

Start journaling!

If you’re excited about journaling now, first things first: grab a journal. Then give yourself 15 minutes a day to write in it, and strive to find a quiet place where you can write in peace. To give you a headstart, here are a few things that you might like to try writing about at first:

  1. How was your day?
  2. Describe a coincidence that happened to you recently.
  3. Describe the last time you experienced déjà vu.
  4. What was the last dream that you had? Can you describe it?

(For more writing prompts, you can go here.)

Remember: at the end of the day, a writing fear is just a fear, and you don’t need to be fearless to eliminate fear. You just need to know how to navigate it, so that you can do what you actually want to do. In this respect, journaling is an invaluable exercise that can help you climb daily nearer to your end goal: a beautiful book.

About Kleia

Kleia Paluca | Why Journaling May Help You Overcome Your Writing Fears | Guest Post | Creative Writing | Writing | Writing Fears | Inspiration Station | RachelPoli.com

Kleia Paluca is a writer based in the Philippines. She reads a lot of books, doodles portraits of famous and unknown people, and would like to make a difference in the world before kicking the bucket.

Be sure to let Kleia know what you thought of her post in the comments! Check out her links and show her some love. If you liked the post, please share it around.

If you’d like to write a guest post for my blog, then read the Guest Post Guidelines.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.com

Patreon | Fiverr | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double Jump

Sign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

How To Build A Fantasy World In Flash Fiction [Guest Post]

I’m happy to welcome Carin Marais back to my blog for another guest post! Thanks, Carin!

Guest Post: How To Build a Fantasy World in Flash Fiction by Carin Marais | Creative Writing | Guest Blogging | Short Story | Fantasy Writing | RachelPoli.com

When writing fantasy or sci-fi stories in a flash fiction it can be difficult to get the world in which the story takes place across because of the word limit. However, there are some steps that you can take that will make your worldbuilding in flash fiction not only work but also stand out.

Choosing a world to write in (a new world/a world you already know)

First of all, you need to decide whether you’ll be writing in the primary world (i.e. our world), or a secondary world. There is a bit of overlap – or grey area, if you want – between primary and secondary worlds. For instance, in “Scorched Earth”, I wrote a “straightforward” historical flash fiction piece, but added some paranormal aspects:

Johannes’ voice sounded in my ears as I turned to climb onto the wagon.

“Want Hij zal Zijn engelen vam u bevelen, dat sij u bewaren in al uw wegen.”

I looked around and spotted him standing some way off. Still dressed in simple clothes, he no longer held a Mauser in his hands. His chest was covered in dark blood and sand crusted his face. I wanted to wipe it away, to tell him it’s alright. I wanted to beat his chest and ask him how he could have left me. How he could let me go to the camps. How he dared recite the Bible to me.

I jumped when a young soldier touched my arm and I stepped back.

Jy sien ook?” he asked, the words barely recognisable. “You see them as well?” he repeated in English, his eyes pleading.

“See what?” I shrugged and climbed onto the wagon, sitting down next to Maria.

The young soldier folded his arms around him, eyes darting from ghost to ghost.” (“Scorched Earth” by Carin Marais, 2018)

Then there are those who are set in a world that is either completely alien to our own (Daily SF has published many stories that uses this wonderfully), or which are a complete secondary world, hinting at a larger world beyond the story:

They had always said that my blood wasn’t pure enough to work here, that the gods would take vengeance for having their holy objects exhibited for all to see. I rolled my eyes at them – but only behind their backs.

The priests added their voices to the surging crowds once money changed hands and their earlier blessing of the travelling exhibition was recanted. All objects were to be returned to the half-forgotten temples.” (“Red” by Carin Marais, 2018)

This also brings me to the first part of worldbuilding when you’re writing flash fiction – build only the part of the world that is necessary for the story.

Building only what is necessary

When you only have a thousand words to work with (give or take), you hardly have time to go into the intricacies of the economic system of the city where your story takes place.

However, if you need to show a disparity in income, for instance, you can mention hijacked buildings turned to slums or the beggars in the streets. Perhaps your character passes a soup kitchen line, or perhaps they drive past informal settlements that line the main roads out of the city. You don’t (necessarily) have to give up too many words for this kind of description if you use your words economically.

You also shouldn’t underestimate the intelligence your readers – you don’t have to spell everything out to them, but just leave enough breadcrumbs for the reader from which to gather the whole picture. You can always make a few notes about the world if you want to return to that world later, but just watch out for ending up with worldbuilder’s disease before you’ve even written the flash piece! This includes writing languages and cultures.

Other languages and cultures

(Fantasy) culture is a lot easier to portray in flash fiction, in my opinion, than other languages. However, using words in another language – or even languages – can be a powerful way to ground the story in a specific milieu.

For instance, I used three languages in “Scorched Earth”; English (the language the story is written in), Dutch (the language of the Bible quotations), and Afrikaans. The story is set during the Anglo Boer War (1899-1902) and, at that time, the Dutch Bible was still used by Afrikaans Christians. Each time, however, I noted that it was verses from the Bible that was being quoted and, in the context of the story, it wouldn’t be a huge problem if the reader didn’t understand the exact verse that was being quoted.

Johannes’ voice sounded in my ears as I turned to climb onto the wagon.

“Want Hij zal Zijn engelen vam u bevelen, dat sij u bewaren in al uw wegen.”

How he dared recite the Bible to me.” (“Scorched Earth by Carin Marais, 2018)

When it comes to using fantasy culture(s) in your fiction, there are some simple steps you can take to make it work.

If you’re just working from a vague idea in your mind, try some free writing to get a better grasp of what the culture is about and where it may have parallels to cultures in the primary world. If it does, and you need to do some research, now is the time. Talk to people of that culture, read up (for example articles by people of that culture) if the culture is on the other side of the world as you, etc. NaNoWriMo forums are especially good for this type of research.

Of course, if it’s a fantasy culture that you’re not actually basing on any real culture (much easier to do in a short piece than an actual novel!), you can basically do what you want and show that element that you want to highlight. For instance, this can be a part of their mythology and ritual as I did in “They Burn Your Birth-Tree” (2017) that I wrote for Paragraph Planet:

They burn your birth-tree with you when you die. Your ash would mix before being scattered by the ever-swirling-whispering-wailing wind. I always thought winter – that dark season – was the perfect time to die. My son was born with the first blossoms. I held the newborn at the newly planted birth-tree next to his mother’s stump. A bitter wind blew ashes from the pyre into the sunlit sky. You shouldn’t die in spring, I thought. “They Burn Your Birth-tree” by Carin Marais (2017)

While the fantasy culture may be foreign or strange to the reader, ways to make it understandable and relatable includes smart naming of the objects or rituals in the culture. So, for instance, I chose the English name “birth-tree” to denote an otherwise strange and alien idea instead of making up a word in another language. The reader immediately has some inkling of what I am referring to even though they have probably never heard of the word before.

You also don’t have to give more information about the use of the tree-burning than that which is in the final story, as the story only hinges on the reader understanding the implications of the mother’s tree having been cut down. The whole history of the tree-burning is therefore unnecessary clutter in the story even though you may have made worldbuilding notes about this. (More about it in the ‘editing’ part of this post.)

The magic system/technology

When writing a magic system or technology in flash fiction, it’s best to keep the magic “magical” and the technology “something that works” as you are really pressed for space.

Remember that it’s always important to focus on the story and what the story and characters need rather than focusing on that which goes on behind the scenes. Your readers are much more likely to enjoy one where the magic just works than one where the magic is being discussed for no apparent reason. Of course, if your whole story is about that, then go right ahead, but don’t feel the need to do it in every story.

The same goes for technology. In a tome of over 100K words, you’ll have more than enough space for explaining how certain technologies work. In 1 000 words, however, it’s unnecessary. All you have to really know that it works (or doesn’t work) and what the actual story is about. For instance:

I pick up the old delivery box and open it. Inside is my stinging, half-beating heart, its cogs and wheels and pipes all scattered. No wonder my chest ached so. I take a small screwdriver and go to work…” (“A Cup of Tea” by Carin Marais, 2018)

Don’t info-dump

All of the above basically boils down to one thing: don’t info-dump in the story. If your story ends up being 2 000 words, it’s more than likely that things can be edited down by half by either re-writing and deleting unnecessary details.

Here is an example of my first draft of the beginning of “They Burn Your Birth-tree” and what ended up in the published story:

“They burn you when you die in the winter, or so the old people always said. When the ground is frozen and the birth-trees bare, they would cut down your birth-tree and burn it with you.” (Draft 1)

Versus

“They burn your birth-tree with you when you die.” (Published story)

This took about 4 edits and I ended being a lot happier with the concise sentence of the final piece than the info-dump of the first draft when I was still finding my feet in the story.

  • Editing your flash piece

When you start to edit your story, first look at the number of words you need to cut – 100? 1 000? Once you know that, you know the minimum you need to trim from the story to turn it into a flash piece.

Start by deleting all unnecessary words. You’d be surprised how many you can use in such a limited space!

Next, go through all your descriptions. How can you tighten them or even rewrite them to make them punchier?

Usually by this time I find that I’d cut quite a large number of words already and may have already hit my target number of words! If not, I look at the story itself. Are there details that I can delete? Or perhaps whole characters that I can leave out without breaking down the story? Remember to spellcheck before posting or sending!

About Carin Marais

Carin Marais is a South African fantasy author and copywriter whose fiction and articles have appeared in Every Day Fiction, Jozi Flash (2016, 2017), Speculative Grammarian, Inkspraak and, most recently, Vrouekeur (June 2018). Her flash fiction collection Dim Mirrors (2016) was followed by Shards of Mirrors in 2018, shortly after the short story Forgotten (2018) was published on Kindle and Kobo. She is also a regular contributor to The Mighty.

Website & Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

Shards of Mirrors By Carin MaraisShards of Mirrors is a free collection of 16 flash fiction pieces by Carin Marais. The stories are thematically linked, with the writer exploring loss, grief, forgetting, and remembering throughout the collection. Though not light-hearted, many of the stories are bittersweet and even hopeful. The genres range from steampunk (“Calling the Rain”), and horror (“The Call from Below”, “Red”), to sci-fi (“Shared Memories in High Definition”, “Petrichor”) and fantasy (“A Cup of Tea”, “A Fair Trade”).

DOWNLOAD SHARDS OF MIRRORS HERE.

Be sure to let Carin know what you thought of her post in the comments! Check out her links and show her some love. If you liked the post, please share it around.

If you’d like to write a guest post for my blog, then read the Guest Post Guidelines.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.com

Patreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double Jump

Sign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Inspiration Station: Fear As Fuel [Guest Post]

It’s my pleasure to welcome Annette Rochelle Aben to my blog once again. This Inspiration Station is brought to you by her. Thanks, Annette!

Inspiration Station: Fear As Fuel | Guest Post | Creative Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

In the Kane Brown/Lauren Alaina song: What If, the duo goes back and forth siting the pros and cons of starting a relationship. Of course, it might work but what if it doesn’t. In the end, it sounds as though they are willing to throw caution to the wind and give it a go, despite their fears. Why? Because the pay-off is more attractive than giving into the fear.
They are using the fear as the fuel to create the argument FOR making their dreams come true.
As writers, we can talk ourselves in or out of everything from hitting the PUBLISH button to even beginning a project. The ten good reasons why we should not move forward, can become the justification to languish in a comfort zone of safety from disappointment. The more frequently we talk ourselves into playing it safe, the further away we drift from the possibility of making our dreams coming true.
I don’t mind having a life in which I never experience happiness from my creative energy is just fine with me.” Said NO ONE EVER!
Fear is merely a word. A word we define for ourselves. We decide if fear is our guide or our prison guard. It is up to us to use the fear of failure to help us explore the possibility of success. The power is ours to wield! Own your “what if’s” and watch the amazing results.

About Annette

Annette Rochelle Aben, Author | Guest Post | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.comLearning to read, opened up world of acceptance and creativity, Annette found irresistible. Learning to write, made that world come alive inside Annette. Publishing books, allowed Annette to share herself with the world.

To date, Annette has self-published 12 books in the categories of poetry, self-help, spirituality and inspiration. A Haiku Perspective 2018 became a #1 Amazon Kindle Best Seller within 3 days of release. Her television commercial copy writing, garnered her an Emmy nomination and a children’s coloring book she designed, won a national marketing award for her, then, employer, United Artist’s Entertainment.

Currently, Annette is the Copy Editor for the digital magazine, The Magic Happens.

Blog | The Magic Happens | Amazon

Be sure to let Annette know what you thought of her post in the comments! Check out her links and show her some love. If you liked the post, please share it around.

If you’d like to write a guest post for my blog, then read the Guest Post Guidelines.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.com

Patreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double Jump

Sign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

How To Master Story Archetypes [Guest Post]

It’s my pleasure to welcome Sacha Black to my blog! Today’s guest post is brought to you by this fabulous writer.

Guest Post: How To Master Story Archetypes by Sacha Black | Creative writing | blogging | RachelPoli.com

The word archetype gets thrown around like candy at Halloween. There’s a ton of villainous archetypes: dark lords, femme fatales, your standard psycho serial killer, and they all play a role. They’re clearly defined, easily distinguishable…

But can anyone actually name me a hero archetype?

I can almost hear the dust balls rolling through the desert… Hero archetypes are much, much harder to define. Sure, you could suggest a maverick cop in a crime series, but wait… that’s a trope, not an archetype. Or what about the chosen one in a fantasy novel? Again, that’s a trope.

Are you stuttering yet?

Let me help.

Hero archetypes don’t exist.

So what is an archetype?

Archetypes are masks worn by characters to serve a particular function at a particular time to move the plot forward.

If you were paying attention, you’d notice I didn’t say ‘worn by the hero’. That’s because an archetype is a plot device; a function of fiction. Archetypes are not specific characters embodying one particular role for all time.

Think of it as character cosplay. If you force a character to act as a mentor to the hero for the entire plot and only as a mentor, you’re squeezing your character into such a tiny box you flatten them, literally and figuratively. You want three-dimensional, rounded characters, not pancakes. Pancakes are only good for breakfast… and maybe for food fights.

But what does this mean for your characters? Well, it means characters, like humans, are transient. Sometimes your mentor will also be your motivator or your ally. Think about all the hats you wear for your BFF. I bet you’ve been a motivator, a shoulder to cry on, a parent when they needed a slap, and a conscience when they did something they shouldn’t.

Top Tip: if you want to add depth to your side characters, make them play an addition role for your hero.

Sacha Black, Author | Guest Post | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.comSo here’s a whistle-stop run down of the major functions your characters can play

  1. Friend Function

I’ve already mentioned this function and how we play different roles for our friends. That’s exactly what this role does. Think Ron Weasley from Harry Potter. The friend plays roles including but not limited to: motivating your hero, stopping her from making a mistake (conscience), to being the shoulder she cries on (companionship).

  1. The guide function

The primary purpose of the guide in a story is threefold:

  • Teach the hero, whether that’s new skills, new knowledge or otherwise
  • Protect the hero from the villain’s devilish party tricks
  • Bestow gifts on the hero, from magical death-wielding weapons to the anecdote that helps the hero have an epiphany.

There are a couple of other types of mentors such as the negative guide.  Who, instead of encouraging the hero down the right path to heroism, manipulates the hero and leads them into the descent of darkness. For example, Littlefinger (Lord Petyr Baelish) in A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin, John Milton in The Devil’s Advocate, Alonzo in Training Day and Gordon Gekko in Wall Street.

  1. The obstacle function

The primary job of the obstacle archetype is to make sure the hero is worthy to move on to the next part of the story. You might think only villains can be obstacles. But not so. Even a friend of the heroes could be an obstacle. In fact, if the obstacle is a friend, it’s even more of a test of the hero’s will power – it’s much harder to go against a friend’s wishes to do ‘the right thing’

  1. Hermes function

Yes, for those of you who like mythology, this is a nod to the Greek emissary and messenger god. Hermes characters have vital information that they bring to the hero. Usually the message leads to a change or plot development, the most significant of which is usually the ‘call to action’ for the hero in the first act of your story. The messages are usually, good, bad or a prophecy style message.

  1. Sly fox function

Aside from a villain, the sly fox is one of my favorite archetypes because they’re so interesting to write. Their purpose is to feed doubt into the plot and, specifically, into the hero’s psyche. They come in two forms. A positive sly fox, like a lover in a romance story that feeds doubt into the heroine’s mind over his true feelings. Or a negative sly fox, who feeds doubt into the hero because, well, he’s an evil S.O.B. Think Scar from the Lion King or Dr. Elsa Schneider from Indiana Jones and Prince Hans from the Disney movie Frozen.

  1. The joker function

The joker is the character that brings mischief, play and fun to the story. Symbolically, it can represent the need for change within the story. They will usually sprinkle your plot with banter and slap the arrogant characters into shape. For example, Dobby the house elf from Harry Potter.

  1. Villain function

Last but by no means least, is, in my opinion, the most important archetype of them all. The villain. If your villain is weak, so is your story. Story is about change, whether it’s your hero’s character arc, or the world around your hero. Something will change. And those changes are created from the conflict in your story.

What’s the source of conflict?

That, dear reader, would be your villain. Give your villain as much love as your hero. Your story will thank you for it.

Sacha Black, Author | Guest Post | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.com

That was a super quick run through of the types of archetypes your hero might need during your story.

If you’d like more in depth information, there’s an entire chapter all about the function of archetypes in my new book: 10 Steps To Hero: How To Craft A Kickass Protagonist.

A bit more about the book:

From cardboard cut-out to superhero in 10 steps.

Are you fed up of one-dimensional heroes? Frustrated with creating clones? Does your protagonist fail to capture your reader’s heart?

In 10 Steps To Hero, you’ll discover: 

+ How to develop a killer character arc

+ A step-by-step guide to creating your hero from initial concept to final page

+ Why the web of story connectivity is essential to crafting a hero that will hook readers

+ The four major pitfalls to avoid as well as the tropes your story needs

Finally, there is a comprehensive writing guide to help you create your perfect protagonist. Whether you’re writing your first story or you’re a professional writer, this book will help supercharge your hero and give them that extra edge.

These lessons will help you master your charming knights, navigate your way to the perfect balance of flaws and traits, as well as strengthen your hero to give your story the conflict and punch it needs.

First, there were villains, now there are heroes. If you like dark humor, learning through examples, and want to create the best hero you can, then you’ll love Sacha Black’s guide to crafting heroes.

Read 10 Steps To Hero today and start creating kick-ass heroes.

About Sacha Black

Sacha Black, Author | Guest Post | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.comSacha Black has five obsessions; words, expensive shoes, conspiracy theories, self-improvement, and breaking the rules. She also has the mind of a perpetual sixteen-year-old, only with slightly less drama and slightly more bills.

Sacha writes books about people with magical powers and other books about the art of writing. She lives in Hertfordshire, England, with her wife and genius, giant of a son.

When she’s not writing, she can be found laughing inappropriately loud, blogging, sniffing musty old books, fangirling film and TV soundtracks, or thinking up new ways to break the rules.

Let Sacha know what you thought of her post in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

How To Guard Your Writing Time [Guest Post]

Today’s blog post is written by Ari Meghlen. Thanks, Ari!

How To Guard Your Writing Time | Guest Post by Ari Meghlen | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.com

Firstly, thanks so much to Rachel for inviting me onto her awesome blog and share my thoughts with all her readers.

Unless you’re a full-time writer, you will have to carve out time for your writing throughout a million and one other tasks from errands, to chores, to a job etc.

So, you need to guard your writing time and here are some simple tips to start you off:

Set a Commitment

Give yourself a commitment.  Whether that’s a daily word count, a monthly scene quota or just a single deadline to complete the first draft.  Write it down.  Put it somewhere you can see it every day when you sit down to write.  Add in a reward for yourself for when you reach that commitment.

Decide the Outcome

Knowing what you want to have done when you sit down to write will reduce delays.  If you’re a plotter, keep your outline close and know what part you want to be writing that day.  If you’re a pantser, decide what you want to be writing – a chapter, a scene etc.

This will save you wasting time sitting before a blank screen wondering what you should write.  The point is to use as much of your writing time actually writing.

Don’t Answer the Phone

If you are not waiting for a specific call, and it’s not an emergency, don’t answer the phone.  If you are able, put your mobile phone on silent during the time of your writing.  You can always ring people back after your writing session.

Turn your phone face down, so that you don’t see it lighting up when you get a text or a call.

Limit your Email Checks

Pick a time for checking your emails and then shut them down and stay out of the Inbox.  Like the calls, unless you are expecting an important email, keep yourself logged out during your writing time.  Emails can wait.

You can even set up an automatic out of office message to bounce to anyone who emails you, letting them know when you will be responding.

Time is Money

When you work a job, you give up time in exchange for money.  Considering your time in terms of money, can really help you to give it its due priority.  It can also help you protect it more effectively and be more likely to say no to unwanted distractions and interruptions.

Let go of Perfection

If you are writing your first draft, don’t aim for perfection right off the bat.  Just get it written.  In the past I got caught up in a cycle of writing and editing.  What happened?  I struggled to get anything finished.  I would get stressed and bounce to a new story.

When I decided to push through and actually stop editing as I was writing my first drafts, (which was really hard) I started to finish things.  This was a great boost as it made me write more in each sitting.

Remember that no one cares as much about your writing time as you do.  Just a few small steps can help you set aside time for your writing and protect that time.

About Ari

Ari Meghlen | Guest Post | How To Guard Your Writing Time | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.comAri is a writer of both traditional fantasy and preternatural urban fantasy.  She also blogs about writing and runs the Twitter Writing Game #TheMerryWriter with Rachel :)

When not deep in her worlds full of scheming monsters, vengeful demons or lost souls, Ari spends her time reading, making jewellery, playing boardgames (not very well) and wandering aimlessly about in nature.

Most days she is surrounded by her noisy cats and an ever-growing pile of books though she also enjoys watching really bad movies with her boyfriend.

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook Author Page

Be sure to let Ari know in the comments below what you thought of her post! If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

My Biggest Writing Fear [& Guest Post Opportunities!]

As writers, we all have fears, insecurities, and doubts about what we do. Being a creator isn’t easy and while it can be relaxing we put our heart and soul into our work. We keep creating though – writing, drawing, making music – whatever it is you do, you keep creating. Still, there are some days when you feel unsure about yourself and your work. So, here’s my biggest writing fear.

My Biggest Writing Fear & Guest Post Opportunities | Blogging | Creative Writing | Writing Fears and Tow to Overcome Them | RachelPoli.com

My Writing Fear

If you know me and you’ve been following this blog for a while, then I assume you know I want to make a living writing. I want to publish books, write articles, and do anything that has to do with writing. There are other things I want to do but haven’t tried yet because time and… well, I plan on too many projects at once.

I say I want to make a living writing, which means I want it for my career and make money from my words. When I say that, I don’t mean I want to be “rich” or “famous” I just want to live comfortably doing what I love for a living. I don’t write for the money, I write because I love it. Unfortunately, in order for me to write all the time, I need to make money off it. It’s kind of an annoying cycle.

With that, I’m most afraid of failing.

No, not failing to make a decent income from my money so I can write comfortably and spend the rest of my days with my imaginary friends. I’m afraid of failing in the way that no one will enjoy my stories.

I think this is a common writing fear – or common fear in general for any creator. You’re afraid of failing in a way that you’ll pour your heart and soul into something and no one will enjoy it.

The truth is, not everyone in the world is going to enjoy your work. Everyone has different likes and dislikes, have different opinions, and view things with a unique perspective. If someone doesn’t enjoy your work, it doesn’t mean that it’s “bad.” It just wasn’t right for that particular person.

I know all this and yet, I still panic about publishing my first book. I’ve put it off for so long because I’ve been afraid no one would buy it or they wouldn’t enjoy it if they did buy it. It’s a vicious cycle. It’s one of those things though that you just have to do it. Work hard and do your best, but you just have to get it out there and do it.

I was super nervous when I posted by very first Short Story Sunday on here. I felt as though it was a test for me. If people responded well to my short stories then maybe I could get away with publishing something. Almost seven years later, nearly 250 shorts and poems later, and I have met quite a few people – readers and writers alike – who have been very supportive, encouraging, and give me constructive criticism. I wouldn’t do anything different and I’m proud to be part of such an awesome community.

Accepting Rejection

It sounds like an oxymoron, but it’s good advice. As a writer, you need to be willing to accept rejection. Not everyone is going to enjoy your work, but there are people out there who will love it.

The fear will always be there as will the nerves, but it’s just something you have to push through. It’s a risk you should be willing to take.

Guest Posts for 2019

I’ll be doing something a little different in 2019 for guest posts. I’m limiting the guest post dates to 24 throughout the year – two dates each month. One guest each month (12 of them) will be normal guest posts where people can pitch a topic based on creative writing or reading and express their thoughts in their own article.

The other 12 guest posts, one for each month, will be under a theme. I’m bringing Inspiration Station back and 2019’s theme will be all about Writing Fears and How to Overcome Them. We’re all have similar fears, but we each have different perspectives on these fears and some might differ than others. I think this would be a fun topic of discussion so we can encourage each other a bit and learn we’re not alone with our fears.

All guest posts, especially the themed ones, are first-come, first-serve. I’m not sure how fast these dates will fill up, but if you would like to write a guest post for my blog in 2019, then be sure to send me an email as soon as possible.

For guest post guidelines, more information, and contact information, you can read the Guest Post Guidelines here. Any questions, don’t hesitate to ask. I look forward to hearing from you!

What’s your biggest writing fear? Let me know in the comments below. If you want to get in-depth about your answer, be sure to check out the Guest Post Guidelines page. If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Sabbath By Yecheilyah Ysrayl [I Am Soul Blog Tour – Guest Post]

It’s my pleasure to welcome Yecheilyah Ysrayl to my blog for the I Am Soul Blog Tour!

I am Soul by Yecheilyah Ysrayl | Poetry | Blog Tour | Blogging | Book Blogger | RachelPoli.com

I just wanna turn off my brain.
Not completely, just enough to gather my breath
and lay it at the head of the bed.
A temporary moment to which renewal finds itself,
Back to my pillow
to which I may die,
And in the same second be reborn.
I want my eyes to bow in submission to my bones,
And my soul to fall slowly to the contours of this mattress.
And for a second pretend that the world has dissolved around me.
For a second, for just a moment, let me lay my body
at the foot of sleep’s doorstep,
Pretend to swim with the clouds,
And at the same moment,
taste of rejuvenation’s delicacies.

About Yecheilyah Ysrayl

Yecheilyah Ysrayl | I Am Soul Author | Blog Tour | Book Blogger | Blogging | RachelPoli.comYecheilyah (e-SEE-li-yah, affectionately nicknamed EC) is an Author, Blogger, and Poet and lives in Marietta, GA with her wonderful husband. She has been writing poetry since she was twelve years old and joined the UMOJA Poetry Society in High School where she learned to perfect her craft. In 2010, at 23 years-old, Yecheilyah published her first collection of poetry and in 2014, founded Literary Korner Publishing and The PBS blog where she enjoys helping other authors through her blog interviews and book reviews. The PBS Blog has been named among Reedsy’s Best Book Review blogs of 2017 and 2018 and has helped many authors in their writing journey. I am Soul is her fourth collection of poetry.

Fun Facts about Yecheilyah:

  • She loves to laugh, and her favorite comedy TV show is Blackish
  • She is originally from Chicago, IL
  • She’s been married to her husband 8 years, together for 11 years
  • She believes eggs makes everything better
  • She is a twin
  • She is addicted to reading and new notebooks
  • Her favorite desert is ice cream

Author Website | Blog | AmazonAmazon Author Central | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

I am Soul is now available on Amazon, iTunes, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and Scribd. Click Here to choose your retailer.

Greenbriar Mall
The Medu Bookstore
2841 Greenbriar Pkwy SW
Atlanta, GA 30331

I am Soul Blog Tour | Yecheilyah Ysrayl | Poetry | Blogging | Book Blogger | RachelPoli.com

Have you read I Am Soul yet? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

If You Can Dream It… [Guest Post]

Please help me welcome DreamItRealiseIt to my blog!

Guest Post: If you can dream it by DreamItRealiseIt | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.com

Dear valued reader,

I would like to speak directly to you to offer you advice and guidence from my own knowledge base and experience.

Writing is hard. Without a doubt.

Some days you are staring at a blank page for ages, hours even, and you can’t seem to gain ANY inspiration at all. On other days you write solidly for four hours without even a toilet or a drink/food break and it feels like you’ve been writing for only minutes! Then on a different day you may read something that you’ve already written and be so disgusted by it that you rip the page up right there and then. Trash. It is just trash.

It does not reflect your amazing writing ability at all. Or you may not even have the confidence to believe you have much writing ability. You may feel disillusioned and depressed… Let me tell you something my avid reader and aspiring writer – DO NOT EVER GIVE UP.

Why do you think you read, huh? To gain inspiration for your writing. People who read widely will without a doubt find the writing part easier than those who don’t. Other writers’ novels, short stories, and articles are great places to find inspiration for your own works. Remember those other writers all started somewhere.

And yes I appreciate when you first start out it is difficult to have confidence in your own writing. Maybe you wrote in secret and have never shown anyone your writing… perhaps you have shown people and they did not like it. Other peoples praise or criticism can affect your wish to be a published or established writer. But, and this is important, try not to let it affect you so much. So maybe someone didn’t like your work – who cares? Plenty of other readers will LOVE it, I promise you. Just make sure you always write, no matter what obstacles come in your way. And above all remember – If you can dream it… YOU can realise it.

Lots of love and hugs and support from someone who has been there.

PS. Never. Never. Never. Give up! Follow your dream at all costs!

Please let DreamItRealiseIt know in the comments below what you thought of her post! If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Never His – A Poem [Guest Post]

It’s my pleasure to welcome Jayati to my blog!

Guest Post: Never His - A Poem by Jayati | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.com

He had no idea who I was,
The girl that stared at him longingly,
The one that loved him crazily,
A girl he never noticed.

She saw him every day,
But he never even gave her a glance,
He shone out bright,
But she hid in the crowd.

He was popular,
He was loved,
She was shy,
No one knew her.

He loved someone else,
While she pined after him,
He was out having fun,
While she sat at home hoping he’d come.

He did not care,
Who she was,
He was in love,
With someone else.

He was her world,
The one she loved,
But she was nothing,
No more than a speck of dust.

About Jayati

Jayati from Junky Writing | Blogging | Guest Post | Poetry | RachelPoli.comHey! I am Jayati, an almost 16-year-old Book Blogger. I live in India, attend High School and spend most of my time reading. I also write some short stories and poems sometimes. I also love playing the guitar and cooking. I love to ramble about anything and everything, but mostly about books.

Blog | Twitter | Goodreads

Did you enjoy Jayati’s poem? Do you write poetry too? Let us know in the comments below.

If you liked this post, please share it around. Also, you can check out the other Guest Posts that have been featured on this blog! If you’d like to be a guest blogger on here yourself or ask me to write a post for you, you can check out the Guidelines.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Jozi Flash 2017 Blog Tour [Guest Post]

Jozi Flash 2017 Blog Tour | Flash Fiction | Anthology | Blogging | Books | RachelPoli.com

This week is a special week as I help host a blog tour for Jozi Flash 2017 by South African Authors! Joining me today is Nicolette Stephens, one of the authors of this flash fiction anthology as well as the publisher from Chasing Dreams Publishing. She wrote a guest post to promote the book for Galit over at Coffee ‘N’ Notes. Unfortunately, Galit was unable to participate as something came up so I’ve taken it upon myself to publish the post. Please be sure to check out Galit’s blog though as she’s a wonderful writer and lovely person!

Please help me welcome Nicolette!

Conception – Pulling Ideas out of Thin Air

I’ve been working on a series of writing exercises, and I’d like to take this opportunity to share the first in the series I’m calling “Quarks”.

Quark (noun: a theoretical subatomic particle.)

In physics, quarks are contemplated as being the building blocks of hadrons. Now, physics doesn’t really have much to do with creative writing, but quark is a great word to describe all the little bits and pieces that go into creating stories. Whether it’s flash fiction, poetry, novels or plays, telling a tale requires certain elements to complete it. Quarks take these elements and explore them in bite-sized chunks that, when put together, help you to understand and build a story from conception, to the end.

In this guest post for Coffee n Notes, you’ll find some exercises for finding inspiration from the world around you and crafting stories even when you don’t feel inspired.

When you decide to tell a story, you’re making a decision to translate abstract thoughts into words that others will resonate with. Sometimes this is a fairly simple process, but often, writers find themselves at a loss.

There are many reasons why this happens, but mostly it’s ascribed to a lack of inspiration, fondly named Writer’s Block. There are a lot of different theories on what causes Writer’s Block, and even more methods to get you out of it.

One of the most popular is that you may have run out of ideas. So in this quark, we’re going to look at where you can find inspiration, which are really just ideas pulled out of thin air.

Where to find inspiration?

Inspiration isn’t a whimsical fairy that strikes whenever she feels like it. Rather, it’s akin to a puppy, which can either be left to run wild and disappear after an interesting scent ignoring all your attempts to recall it, or with training and patience, will become a loyal friend, responding faithfully to your commands.

As with puppies though, training inspiration is not a one-time task. It’s a continual process that continues with regular reinforcement.

When you are inspired to create something, whether it’s a piece of writing, art or a school project; it simply means that you’ve had an idea you want to make concrete. Thoughts and ideas are abstract, but when you use them to create something, you turn them into a concrete form that can be appreciated by others.

Good ideas are considered to be as elusive as inspiration, but in general, the only thing lacking in creating an inspired idea is a process that works the majority of the time. Not everyone will think and respond the same way to the same process – if you don’t believe me, just ask people how they interpret emoticons. While some of the expressions are universal, the way people use and interpret them are often very different.

The same holds true with processes designed to inspire ideas for writers. Writing prompts work fairly often, so they’ve become very popular with writers across the board. A Google search on creative writing ideas will give you a host of different resources you can use.

In this quark though, we look at something closer to home. Your immediate environment.

If you look around you at this moment, you are surrounded by objects, places, words, people and emotions.

Exercise 1 – Bits and bobs

In this exercise, I want you to list five of each of the above from your immediate environment as I’ve done in the example below.

Objects: Pencil box, owl statue, oil paints, handkerchief, yoga mat.

Places: Field across the road, shopping mall, neighbour’s driveway, abandoned railway station, lawyer’s office.

Words: Bottle, loquacious, train, noise, birds.

People: Shoppers, young child, train passengers, pedestrian, homeless man.

Emotions: Happiness, fear, curiosity, anger, grief.

You may find that you end up linking several of the categories without meaning to, because your mind will automatically form associations between items. That’s okay, use the table and split them up in their categories, or keep them in the same row if you like the association between them.

Words and objects are very similar categories, but whereas objects are commonplace things found in your immediate surroundings, words can be anything you’ve seen, heard or thought about recently.

Wherever possible, try to apply your current environment to the list. Emotions for example, may not be what you’re currently feeling, but maybe you’ve felt them in the last few days, or it’s something you imagine someone else would have felt when you saw them in a certain situation.

Your turn: List five of each object, place, words, people and emotions.

Exercise 2 – What’s the catch?

Ask who, what, where, why, when and how.

The object of this exercise isn’t to ask logical questions that can be answered with the most common response. Rather, it’s designed to engage the creative side of your brain.

So for example, don’t use “who” with the “people” category for your first round of questions.

Below is an example of a question phrased for one item in each category:

Object: Owl statue.

Question: Where did the statue come from and why is it chipped on the corner?

Place: Lawyer’s office.

Question: Why is the exterior of the building so run down for what seems to be a profitable business, given that the car that’s always parked there is a top of the line BMW?

People: Pedestrian

Question: Where was he going in such a hurry that he didn’t see the car turning the corner before he stepped out into the road?

Word: Loquacious

Question: Who would use a word like that in an everyday situation and what do they do for a living?

Emotion: Curiosity

Question: What is it about curiosity that it seems to be as contagious as yawning?

Some of these questions may end up never being used – I don’t like the one I created about curiosity for instance, so I may try to think of something else to ask that gets me a response I’m excited about, but I will only do that later, when I’ve exhausted the answers to my first questions.

Your turn: Ask a question about each of the items on your list. You can choose one item from each category, or do it for all of them dependent on how much time you have available.

Exercise 3 – Seeking Answers

The third and final exercise is when you start the process of developing your story. Although the answers to the questions you asked in Exercise 2 are kept simple, they form the basis of your plot – the hook you use to reel in an audience.

There are different methods you can use to answer the questions, and it’s a good idea to switch between them regularly when doing these exercises. Sometimes you’ll find one that works really well, and it will become a habit to use that for everything, which may result in writing which follows a predictable pattern for readers. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing – there’s not really a right or wrong in any form of art, writing included – but challenging yourself brings you out of your comfort zone and often inspires you. So don’t be afraid to try new things.

Below, I’ve used the question about the lawyer and a technique called word association to answer it:

Technique: Word Association. We’ve all played games where someone says a word, and you say the first word that pops into your head in response. This is similar, where each word builds on the last to slowly develop a story. When you run out of words, use the words you’ve come up with to piece together the full sentence.

Answer: Lawyer – criminal – defence – failed – arrested – innocent – broke. The lawyer is a criminal defence lawyer who failed to get his client acquitted. The client was actually innocent, but went to jail for a crime he didn’t commit. The lawyer is broke which is why his business is falling apart.

Expensive car – gift – client – wife of client – actual criminal – secret. The car is a gift from his client – the wife of the man who was wrongfully convicted. The wife is the true criminal, and is sleeping with the lawyer who was a good friend of the couple’s before their affair. He knows her secret and is beginning to reconsider his actions.

Your turn: Choose a technique and answer the questions you asked about your items in Exercise 2. 

This brings us to the end of Quark 1 – Conception. I hope you’ve found it useful and would love to hear all about your experiences working through the exercises. Why don’t you share an example of your own in the comments below?

About Nicolette

Nicolette Stephens | Author | Publisher | Guest Post | Blogging | Blog Tour | RachelPoli.comDreams and storytelling have always been a part of my life, and as a writer I know the pitfalls involved in trying to publish. This led to the creation of Chasing Dreams Publishing, where I aim to help other writers share their stories.

There is nothing more exciting than seeing a story unfold on the page, and even more so when it gets published! After years working in the corporate world, I decided it was time to strike out and fulfil my dreams of writing full time.

On a daily basis, I’m inspired by people who chase their dreams (whether or not they’re related to writing), and this inspiration translates to my stories, workshops and writing groups.

Jozi Flash is a product of this inspiration.

About Jozi Flash 2017

It’s not quite the Gummi Bears, but it certainly bounces around a lot.

Jozi Flash 2017 combines the talents of ten brilliant authors with one gifted artist, to bring you a collection of 80 flash fiction stories across eight different genres.

From a children’s story about the folly of summoning dragons, to the horrors held in deliciously treacherous ice cream, the authors take you on journeys that weave fantasy and folklore together alongside practical detectives and everyday tragedy.

With stunning artwork prompts by Nico Venter, these South African authors have created an anthology that will leave you breathless.

Ten talented authors and one gifted artist joined forces to create an anthology of flash fiction stories that embody the multicultural melting pot that is South Africa.

For more info on the individual authors, take a look at their author pages here.

Download the book here!

International Giveaway

Win free copies of eBooks by three Jozi Flash 2017 authors:

Beneath the Wax by Nthato Morakabi

1723: Constantine Bourgeois is a man of many secrets. Artisan by day, killer by night, he turns his victims into wax figures for his shop.

2045: Richard Baines works for the renowned Anthony Garfield Historical Museum. His mundane existence is a stark counterpoint to his fascination with serial killers and science fiction.

Constantine’s nightmares drive him to undertake a journey to uncover a long-forgotten secret. Richard’s research uncovers a company secret and the mystery of Madame Bourgeois.

Two men, two timelines, and truths that will only be revealed when they look Beneath the Wax

Dim Mirrors by Carin Marais

Dim Mirrors is a collection of 39 flash fiction stories that open windows into worlds of fantasy and nightmare. Interwoven with images from mythology and folklore are the themes of love, loss, and memory. The comical “Not According to Plan” leads to more serious and introspective works like “Blue Ribbons” and “The Destroyer of Worlds”, while mythology and folkloric elements come together in stories like “The Souls of Trees” and “Ariadne’s Freedom”.

Sketches by Nicolette Stephens

Like art sketches, flash fiction stories are fleeting moments captured in a few hundred words.

In a world without men, the first boy child is welcomed as the saviour of his race; a cuckoo clock holds death and destruction in its beautifully carved figures; and a snowman holds a silent vigil of peace during war.

In this collection of 50 stories, illustrated with her artwork, the author delves into worlds of imagination and reality inspired by words and drawings.

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then I reserve the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time I will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Enter the giveaway here!

Jozi Flash 2017 Blog Tour | Flash Fiction | Anthology | Reading | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Let Nicolette know what you thought of her guest post! Have you read Jozi Flash 2017 yet? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double Jump

Sign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

How To Organize Your Schedule To Write Effectively [Guest Post]

It’s my pleasure to welcome Crystal Roman to my blog!

How To Organize Your Schedule to Write Effectively | Guest Post | Creative Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Famous writers and masterminds created their own daily routine, balanced between work and leisure, to find sources of inspiration.

How To Organize Your Schedule To Write Effectively | RachelPoli.com
http://ozpnpila.pl/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/terminarz.jpg

 

A daily routine is something we all have to follow in order to manage daily chores and work more or less effectively. The basis of everyday life is habits and rites, which we can borrow from others or invent some ourselves. Great writers coped with the same difficulties that we are dealing with today, no matter how brilliant they were.

In today’s post, we would like to expand on how to find the strength to write daily, how to keep a balance between work and leisure and how to manage time effectively. In addition, you might want to see this post and learn how to study more effectively.

1. SLEEP

During life, a person invents their own effective time management strategies. These strategies can be infinitely diverse: a thing that works for one person will not work for the other. Gustave Flaubert, for example, could only write at night, as during the day, he would get distracted from work by the slightest noise. Günther Grass replied to this that it’s impossible to write at night. Although you might have some inspiration at that time, when you read your text in the morning, it will be no good. Therefore, he only started to work in daylight to stay time effective.

Modern American writer Nicholson Baker has come up with time management techniques to accommodate two whole mornings in one day. His usual day begins with the fact that he wakes up at four or half past four AM. He writes something, while sometimes drinking coffee. He writes for about an hour and a half, and then, he goes back to sleep waking up around half past eight.

Interestingly, many creative people experienced problems with sleep. For example, William James was forced to lull himself with chloroform for a quite some time, while Franz Liszt walked restlessly around the room at night and tried to compose music. Charles Darwin would meditate on some scientific problem for a long time even when he was lying in bed at night already. So much for effective time management.

Some found the traditional sleep regime uncomfortable or not effective enough when tasked with the “how to plan your day” question. American architect and inventor Buckminster Fuller came up with an effective planning scheme for “high-frequency” sleep: he fell asleep for a short time during the day, feeling tired, and then again returned to work. As his biographer J. Baldwin notes, Fuller “frightened the observers, plunging into sleep for a few moments, as if he was pushing the switch button in his head. It happened so quickly that it seemed more like a fit. ”

In contrast, Renee Descartes used a time planner and slept every day for ten to eleven hours and allowed himself to wander through the woods, orchards and bewitched castles, where he tasted “all imaginable joys.” Some relaxation and idleness, in his opinion, is necessary for a good work of the mind.

2. FOOD

Many writers, artists and thinkers preferred lean and light food: Picasso, for example, ate only vegetables, fish, rice, and grapes. However, Francis Bacon had two or three lavish meals a day and drank up to half a dozen bottles of wine. This did not impede his work, and he argued that he liked working hungover because the brain was full of energy and all the thoughts were more distinct than ever.

Honore de Balzac consumed up to 50 cups of the strongest coffee a day in order to maintain the right amount of energy. In addition to this, Wisten Hugh Oden was also taking amphetamines daily and called his regular diet consisting of alcohol, coffee, tobacco, and amphetamines labor-saving supplies.

Tobacco in, general, can be considered one of the most common stimulants. Sigmund Freud, who smoked almost all his life, even lamented his seventeen-year-old nephew, who refused to smoke cigarettes.

The Bohemian way of life, which is often adhered to by creative people such as writers, makes them more prone to drinking and drugs. However, there are exceptions here. For example, Ingmar Bergman always worked sober and even drunken alcoholic Francis Scott Fitzgerald in later years said that it became clearer to him that writing a long story, as well as the subtle perception and judgment during editing,  are incompatible with drinking.

Here you can recall the famous statement made by Ernest Hemingway: “Write drunk, edit sober.” For some, a slight intoxication is not bad, but for others, a clear and calm mind is required when writing. In such a case, it is better to drink just green tea. If you still have trouble with your writing, though, you could check out this website to get essay writing help.

How To Organize Your Schedule To Write Effectively | RachelPoli.com
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR_zZIaetDMdgeVRVOcn1Wa9WZOvDF0XV20uKkbN7xbn_70X4eP

3. REST

A timely rest for writers is no less important than concentration. It is very easy to get carried away in some book, but you need also to find some time to relax, which could be arranged with the help of some good daily schedule planner.

Beethoven would go out for a long walk after lunch if he were stuck with some task, which lasted almost the rest of the day. Another amateur walker Søren Kierkegaard in between work went around the whole of Copenhagen not bothering much on how to improve time management. Benjamin Franklin took air baths for about an hour in the morning and then doze for a while.

Like all of us, the great minds also suffered from a lack of concentration and procrastinated for the lack of a weekly schedule planner. The problem of procrastination was very troubling, for example, for William James. He was a university professor and often postponed the preparation of lectures until the last minute.

For many intellectuals leading a secular lifestyle, rest is all about night binges, receptions of guests, trips to restaurants and bars. However, there are less tiring ways to relax. For example, Francis Bacon read cookbooks before going to bed. Woody Allen sometimes took a shower several times a day to escape from work, and David Lynch practiced transcendental meditation.

How To Organize Your Schedule To Write Effectively | RachelPoli.com
http://blog.careerhq.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Event-planner-2-.jpeg

Summing up, we hope that this post encompassing mostly writers along with other great minds demonstrated how differently they went about organizing their own time management plan and daily routine. You may want to make use of some of their habits and see which work for you the best. Another option is to go for some work schedule maker, which you can find online.

About Crystal Roman

Crystal Roman is an American writer who works in the whodunit genre. In his spare time, he helps out university students at TypeMyEssays with their essays and other types of academic works.

How do you organize your writing schedule? Let us know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around. Also, you can check out the other Guest Posts that have been featured on this blog! If you’d like to be a guest blogger on here yourself or ask me to write a post for you, you can check out the Guidelines.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

How To Create Your Own Fantasy Language [Guest Post]

It’s my pleasure to welcome Carin Marais to my blog!

Guest Post: How To Create Your Own Fantasy Language by Carin Marais | Blogging | Creative Writing | Fantasy | Fantasy Writing | RachelPoli.com

You’ve probably heard of Sindarin and Quenya even if you don’t know a word of either language. These two constructed languages which J.R.R. Tolkien created have, for many, become the benchmarks of languages used in fantasy and for science fiction, there is Klingon from the Star Trek universe.

Writing in a secondary world means creating not only peoples and cultures but also the world’s languages – or at least parts of the languages. The problem with creating these is where to actually start.

This is also the question I came to stand before when starting to write fantasy, and I hope some of these tips and resources will come in handy when you start to create your own language(s).

Take your time

You might not want to tinker with a language more than is absolutely necessary for the story or novel you are writing. Perhaps you only need a greeting, a blessing or a curse. However, if you’re planning on writing a series, you will need to have a much better grasp of the language you’ve created and build on the vocabulary as well. This takes time – you cannot build a whole language in a day.

Get some help, aka, resources are your friends

I came across some very helpful books (which also don’t cost the world, as most of the linguistics textbooks are quite if not extremely expensive to buy…) in my search for language building resources – The Conlanger Lexipedia and The Language Construction Kit, both by Mark Rosenfelder.

Quite a small crash course in linguistics, these volumes show you how languages of differing complexities can be created.

Bilingual dictionaries – especially, I find, of dead languages – are very good to have at your side when you are in need of vocabulary inspiration.

University departments often have available niche dictionaries that can either be searched or downloaded. Then there are also sites like Wulfila.be that goes into the minutia of the Gothic fragments still available to us.

Archive.org is also a fascinating site on which to find these kinds of dictionaries and they also often go for a steal in the Kindle store, just saying.

Listen to languages

Honestly, though. Listen to other languages being spoken even if you don’t understand them. (She says, living in a country with 11 official languages…)

If you’re living somewhere where mostly one language is spoken, go onto YouTube and listen to videos in other languages to get the feel of their sound, their rhythm, etc. You can then use some of these characteristics in your own language(s).

There may even be a language you love the sound of. Then all you do is incorporate those sounds into your language if you don’t want to or can’t use the actual language.

Start with what you need right now

Although you can start building your language by making lists and lists (and lists) of words, it’s important to keep in mind the type of words you’re actually going to use. For instance, if you’re writing a fantasy epic set somewhere in 400 BC, you probably won’t need a word for “spaceship” or “laptop”.

How I go about building languages

The way in which I build my languages is by first seeing what I will need to write or name in those languages. For instance, while building a chant for The Ruon Chronicles, I first wrote it in English and then translated it:

English: Show yourself, servant of the deepest Darkness. One who has turned from the path to follow the Betrayer, show yourself.

 

Fantasy language: Khalla sah s’elaras verdun nakhan han sah.

Agr elstanbrahta se tellaria na Lewjan nakhan han sah.

 

In this case, the word that actually needed the most work was “deepest”.

The word for deep/deepest was constructed ‘backwards’, working from the word for “valley” (elir), which was already in place. I decided that the word for deep would, therefore, be “elara”, which would mean that “elaras” would mean deepest.

Have fun

Most of all, remember that you’re supposed to have fun while creating the language. Choose sounds you like (cellar door, anyone), make the grammar as easy or difficult as you want, and let your imagination run wild. It’s your world, so you get to choose!

Resources:

Here are some resources that I use (or plan to use in the future…)

Websites:

Archive.org (Basically anything your heart desires)

Wulfila (Gothic)

Grammar, etc. of Afrikaans (I’m biased as it’s my mother tongue…), Dutch, and Frisian (written in English)

Septentrionalia

The University of Texas at Austin: Linguistics Research Centre

Books:

A Secret Vice: Tolkien on Invented Languages by Dimitra Fimi and Andrew Higgins

Advanced Language Construction by Mark Rosenfelder

Linguistics: A Very Short Introduction by P.H. Matthews

The Conlanger’s Lexipedia by Mark Rosenfelder

The Language Construction Kit by Mark Rosenfelder

About Carin Marais

Carin Marais | Author | How To Create Your Own Fantasy Language | Guest Post | Blogging | Creative Writing | RachelPoli.comCarin Marais is a South African fantasy author whose fiction and articles have appeared in Every Day Fiction, Jozi Flash (2016, 2017), Dim Mirrors (2016), Speculative Grammarian, Inkspraak and, most recently, Vrouekeur. She is also a contributor to The Mighty.

Website/Blog | Twitter | Facebook | Patreon | Instagram

What are your thoughts on creating your own fantasy language? Let Carin know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around. Also, if you’d like to be a guest on my blog, check out my Guest Posting Guidelines!

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

When Destiny Takes A U-Turn [Guest Post]

Today’s guest post is a short story brought to you by Saba. Thanks, Saba!

Guest Post by Saba | Short Story | Creative Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

          Light sunny morning during the winter days, the greenery around me was smiling, but a little reluctantly. The chill in the air was bothering them, as it was bothering us all! I was all sweaty running along the lines of the corner of the park losing away my calories. Gosh! I am still some pounds over the regular weight. I’ll have to cut out the size of those coffee cups too. But, the stress level that’s always up, doesn’t let me decrease them. The vacation plans I had, have gone down the drain yet again. The huge piling up of bills making it impossible for me to get some money aside for traveling. Sigh! It’s all work again this year. And living all alone adds up to the misery more. The thought of having someone care for me engulfed me deeply. The longing I have for that motherly figure increased. Mum, it would have been great if you would have been here with me. I wish I could fly backward, to the years of carelessness, the years of glory. Strange, but destiny played a great joke with humans with the greatest tragedy, it never allows them to relieve their memories again, never allows them to sneak into their past ever.

These thoughts were making me tired, I thought I should rest for a while. I rested my head on the hard seat of the park and didn’t know when dozed off!

“Hey, you!” Somebody shook me fiercely, “How can you sleep in a busy park? You ain’t a child anymore!” The stranger with a long beard and grey hair, thin as a stick with wide fierce eyes stared me back.

“I wish I could be!” I murmured and started tracing my steps towards home.

“Hey listen! what did you just say? you want to be a child once again?”

I stared at him intently, “I want to be, but you know what, destiny never takes a U-turn!” I sighed.

“For sure it doesn’t but blessings are counted and wishes do come true!” he said. I smiled sadly and turn to go.

The stranger shouted back, “Remember girl, wishes do come true and blessings bear fruits.” I nodded and went back home, as it is I was late to office. Now I will have to rush fast and finish out my freshening up and breakfast soon.

“Sarah! Come, dear, your breakfast is ready!” came the voice from downstairs.

Mom? I was shocked! How can mom come back, she was dead since two years. This is unbelievable. I rushed downstairs, oh yes! Oh my God! I clasped the stairs so that I couldn’t fall down.

“Mom?” I called up slowly.

“Yes dear, come down and finish your breakfast. Or are you still longing to quarrel with me for any other issues?”

I blinked, went back upwards in a total panic state.

Date, let’s check today’s date, I went towards the calendar, it was 31st March 2012! Means I have actually traveled back to a time, 6 years back, time actually crawled behind, or rather fled behind? Unbelievable! I went to the mirror and automatically my hand went to my wide opened mouth. There stared a 15-year-old Sarah at me, the one with some pimples on her face and wide curious eyes. Was that stranger some kind of a magician who made time travel back for me? Hunh!

Whatever, now I am a 15-year-old teenager with an IQ of 21 and experience of all the tough times. Great! Could life have been weirder?

“Sarah, if you don’t want to have anything, you can say that plainly. You don’t need to behave like a strange human running from one place to another. It’s OK, I’ll clear the table away.” Mom looked sad when she said this.

I ran towards her and gave her a long hug. I missed her, God, I missed her like mad.

“It’s strange you know, yesterday you were angry at me because I came to your high school results dressed like an old-fashioned aunt and talked in broken English and today, you are hugging me as if I am just out of my grave!” She asked with watery eyes and oh, so near she was to the reality.

I then recalled all the times when I had always spoken to her with arrogance, made her felt so downtrodden. Insulted her in front of my friends and gave them a chance to laugh at her on her face. Just because my father was now a successful businessman and used to send me loads of pocket money and mum was just a rejected divorced wife of his. He couldn’t care more for her anyways. She was just kept as a nanny to look after his beloved daughter. All those money on my account and the ATM card to make use of that income as I liked on this small age went to my head and made me an arrogant brat.

Tears of shame went down on my cheeks. “I am sorry mum. Would you believe me if I could tell you I am sorry and I have learned my lesson of life? Would you accept the fact that overnight I have turned in to an adult who knows what hurting her mother is and how painful and lonely staying away from you would be?” She looked at me puzzled, surely thinking what went into my head now. But, Oh, she was a mother and loved me so much.

She said, “It’s OK dear! I believe you. It’s never too late to say sorry and never too early to learn your lesson from life. Come, let’s have your breakfast.” We went down and the breakfast on the table made me count all those calories automatically.

“Oh! I couldn’t have all that without my Fitbit.” I squeaked.

“Fit what? What’s that now?” And then I remembered, six years down the lane, these calorie counting bands never existed. I went ahead gaining those extra calories. I have six years to burn those calories after all.

The landline phone was screaming on its top voice. I pressed the pillow more fiercely on my ears. God! When are those days coming when these will rarely exist? Gosh! I was already wishing to be an adult again. No, I have got a chance to relive my teen days, I am not going to waste it just like I before did. I will relive them fully, at their best.

“Sarah, it’s your friend asking for another weekend out with them. What do you want to do?”

I jumped on my bed and went down to answer and accept the offer. After all, I wanted to relive my life the best way.

“Wait, don’t accept it now,” Mum said. I took the phone from her and declined the offer sadly and faced my mum asking why she didn’t let me go. “It’s good to enjoy Sarah, but you should start saving too. It’s going to be soon when all these money that you get are going to stop coming and you are going to be on your own. Do you want to go bankrupt then? Do you want your bills piled up high and you barely surviving with bread and butter? Start saving, this isn’t going to snatch you your happiness of life, rather it would divide the same for you. So that you may get your share of happiness timely.” those words were said before.

I remembered very well. In the same manner, the same situation. Then, I had scolded her, packed up and fled with my ATM card. Now, I know it’s a chance for me to improve my life. A message from my sweet mother in the grave to me to make me know her advice were and are a gem, to be treasured. Hence, I started saving and started rectifying my previous mistakes.

Days of carelessness followed, but my studies were now a matter of first priority for me. I wanted to become a better candidate for my post. I enjoyed hanging around with friends, playing that loud music while I did the laundry and helped mum. Even she was shocked at the change, but I knew what dealing with laundry alone is. Spent lots of time talking to her, listening to her tales of my toddlerhood and laughed along with her.

She was ill, so much I thought instead of four years later, she may be leaving me now. The thought started clutching my heart. No! I couldn’t let her go so fast. I will force her to stay with me more. I don’t want her to go ever. Thus, I was beside her each moment. Every minute, every second. I never left her side. Once, she was so much burning with fever, she passed out her pee on her clothes and was quite embarrassed about it. My thoughts raged back and brought back the same scene of years back to life, the arrogant girl as I was, still, that day seeing her so much in misery, I cleaned her, washed and changed her and told her it’s OK, but all that was done so dryly.

But still, she clasped my hand and put her another hand on my head, “My baby, I am so sorry for being such a nuisance. But today what you have done for me, no child does for her parent without making them feel embarrassed. Thank you so much and may God give you whatever you wish for. May the angels be with you when you are stuck in a serious situation in life, my child.” She was saying those words with tears on her cheeks and face.

I was standing there recollecting that moment again and cleaned up her again, the same way I did before and she slept peacefully. I stood staring at her with my thoughts jumbled. Some going back to six years before and staring at her tear filled face and some at present taking in her loving personality inside me, knowing soon after some time I’ll be alone again, with all my problems to face, I’ll be again mature.

“Hey, you! Didn’t I tell you not to fall in sleep at a park?” I blinked the same stranger stared back at me with the same freaky large eyes. And I was still in my morning tracksuit with a Fitbit on my wrist. I gazed at him like a fool, open-mouthed and with a kaleidoscope of thoughts on my mind. Oh, maybe I slept hard and dreamt. Dreamt of all those moments I could have spent lovingly with mum, of all those advice I could have followed that would have left my life easier than it was today, of all those things I could have done so that my life would have guilt-free today. Sigh! Destiny never takes a U-turn Sarah, come let’s go back in the living real world. I stood and started walking back.

“You going again?” The stranger asked from behind.

“Did I go before too?” I was so puzzled.

“You thought you were dreaming. Isn’t it?”

This puzzled me even more. “Wasn’t I?” I inquired.

“Maybe, but your destiny took u-turn you see! You wished to go back to time again and you were given that chance. It’s good to know you changed your destiny for better. Not all get that chance, and even if they do, not all take it seriously.”

“You mean I actually went back in time and rectified my mistakes?” I asked with amazement.

“For a month, yes! You went back in time and relieved your moments.” He answered.

“But it’s impossible. I was just dreaming.  It’s impractical. Life doesn’t go back in time!”

“Yes, life doesn’t reverse back in time and destiny never takes a U-turn. But, remember I told you, wishes do come true and blessings get answered.”

“But who blessed me such hugely that the blessing changed the rule of the universe? What kind of blessing that was that changed the course of destiny, of time?” I was so curious.

He smiled calmly. “A mother! The most loving person on earth. When she wishes something for her child deeply, it’s accepted. Her words of bringing your wish come true forced the destiny to change its course, it forced the time to retaliate back and give you the second chance in life.”

And then I remembered my mum saying, “Thank you so much and may God give you whatever you wish for.”

He looked at me and started walking in the opposite direction knowing very well that now I knew the answers to my questions.

“Hey, but who are you? I have never seen you before here.” I screamed towards him.

He turned, smiled and pointed his finger towards the sky. Then came the answer to my this question too, “May the angels be with you when you are stuck in a serious situation in life, my child”.

I stood there perplexed, watching him go. I somehow felt relieved now, I wasn’t alone anymore. The blessings of my mum were with me, I know the rectification of my mistakes will play as a life saver for me now. I am among those lucky ones who get a chance to rewrite their destiny twice, for whom destiny took a U-turn!

About Saba

Guest Post by Saba | Short Story | Blogging | RachelPoli.comI am Saba Irfan Ladha, an Indian food, fashion, travel and lifestyle blogger. I am also an active Instagrammer and a connoisseur on Zomato. I love to explore everything around me and replay the same in the most creative manner in my blogs.

Connect With Saba

Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook ProfileFacebook Page | Zomato | Email

Did you enjoy Saba’s story? Let her know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com