Posted in Book Reviews, Reading, Uncategorized

Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepard

Title: Pretty Little Liars
Author: Sara Shepard

Published: October 2006 by HarperTeen

Genre: Young Adult

How I got the book: I bought it 

Summary:

Three years ago, Alison disappeared after a slumber party, not to be seen since. Her friends at the elite Pennsylvania school mourned her, but they also breathed secret sighs of relief. Each of them guarded a secret that only Alison had known. Now they have other dirty little secrets, secrets that could sink them in their gossip-hungry world. When each of them begins receiving anonymous emails and text messages, panic sets in. Are they being betrayed by some one in their circle? Worse yet: Is Alison back?

My Review:

FIRST THOUGHTS

I have read this book before. According to my Goodreads account, it was way back in 2012. I’ve been getting into the show again now that it’s ended. I’ve decided to finally get around to reading the books since I have most of the series sitting on my bookshelves.

PLOT

We get to know five high school girls: Alison, Aria, Spencer, Emily, and Hanna. They’re the best of friends, each with their own dirty secret(s). They are the most popular girls in school, Alison being the ring leader of the group.

On the summer before high school begins, they have a slumber party. When the girls wake up, Alison is gone. She was never found. This book takes place three years later. Aria, Spencer, Emily, and Hanna have moved on and aren’t really friends anymore. But once they start receiving odd messages that not only sound like Alison, but are also threatening, that they come together to figure out who is doing this to them.

That’s about it. Even though this is just book one nothing really happened. I felt as though this was more of an introduction to the series. We learned a lot about the main characters, but that was about it. Nothing really happened until there was about 20-30 pages left in the novel. Because of that, it was a bit boring.

CHARACTERS

I enjoy all the characters in the book. Aria comes home from living abroad with her family in Iceland for two years and winds up crushing on her new English teacher. Hanna had transformed her chubby self over the summer before high school along with Mona, who was a “loser” when Ali ran the school. Hanna and Mona are the new “It” girls. Spencer is just as overachieving as ever while she tries to hook up with her sister’s boyfriend. Emily is the star swimmer for their school’s team. And when new girl Maya moves into Ali’s old house, Emily begins to question her sexuality.

Ali was most certainly the alpha dog and practically ran the whole school. A lot of people are glad she’s gone and they feel safe again. Still, even though she’s a total mean girl, I think Ali is one of my favorite characters. She seems to have it all together, even though I don’t agree with her tactics on how to get people to do the right thing.

WRITING STYLE

This book is written like any other general novel. It’s a typical young adult “high school drama” type story. Still, nothing was really special about the writing style. I didn’t fall in love with the author’s words and some of the characters just felt like supporting cast (that includes the main girls in some parts). It’s not bad and certainly easy to read, but I’m not excited about it.

OVERALL

When I first read this in 2012, I had given it a five-star rating. I changed it to three. One, I think I’ve martured a lot in five years and this whole high school drama is a bit overrated to me. Two, because nothing really happened in this book. This is book one in a long suspense series, but we got more background than anything else, which is a pretty slow start in my opinion.

Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepard gets…

3 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“They felt kind of like dolls, with Ali arraigning their every move.” -Sara Shepard, Pretty Little Liars

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Posted in Book Reviews

Reading Other Book Reviews: A Matter Of Opinion

Before you read a book, do you head over to Goodreads and read a few reviews? When you’re about to make your decision on a rating, do you check out the ratings on Goodreads first?

If you’re debating on whether or not you want to buy a book, do you check if the average rating is five stars or two?

If you do, then… Stop.

Opinion Matters: Reading Other Book Reviews

I’m not here to tell you what you can and can’t do, but I personally don’t think it’s a good idea to read reviews before reading the book yourself.

I’d be lying if I said I didn’t check out the ratings and such beforehand, but I do try to shy away from reading the actual reviews.

Reviews are meant to help the author. The more positive reviews, the higher up on the pedestal the book goes. The more people will likely buy the book if they see it has 5,000 ratings, especially 5,000 5-star ratings. If it remotely seems interesting to them and they see it has a decent following, they’ll pick up the book.

Still, I’ll admit that there have been times when a book has seemed interesting to me and then I look at the ratings and see it didn’t do that great. Instead of getting the book, I’ll put it on my wishlist for later (and often times forget about it) or just put it back on the shelf.

This isn’t really a fair thing to do.

I know I’ve stressed this enough in my other book reviewing posts, but… everyone interprets the story differently. We all have different opinions on what we like and don’t like, what we thought worked well in the book and what we thought didn’t work.

If you pick up a mystery novel and there are five people who didn’t care for it, you may still enjoy the book simply because mystery is your favorite genre.

It’s not fair to put a book back on the shelf simply because a few people thought the main character was a bit dry.

You might as well judge a book by its cover if you’re going to base your bookshelf on other peoples thoughts.

But let’s be honest here; we all judge books by their covers. But that’s another story for another day.

Do you typically read reviews before buying a book? Do you shy away from them? Let me know in the comments below!

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Why It’s Okay To Say No To Book Review Requests

When you run a book blog, the more it grows, the more authors may come across it. If you have a decent following then they’re going to want you to review their work.

Everyone likes different genres, some more than others. If you love mystery novels and can’t stand historical fiction, then what do you do if an author asks you to review their historical fiction book?

Why It's Okay To Say No To Book Review Requests

A lot of reviewers don’t like saying no to authors when they ask such a request. I’m one of those reviewers. Sometimes it’s hard to say no.

When an author, a publisher, or a publicist contacts you, you feel flattered. How could they have possibly come across a blog such as your own? And your blog looked good enough to them to make them want to contact you. It makes you feel good so of course, you want to please them.

However, saying no to a review request will please them better rather than reviewing a book you won’t enjoy and therefore won’t give a good review.

A book review is nothing more than your opinion on the book. We all like different things and read books from different perspectives.

There are no bad books, but if there’s a book I don’t particularly care for, I’m not going to give it five stars.

When writing a book review, be sure to make it clear that you’re just stating your own opinion. Authors obviously don’t want anything 1- or 2-star ratings on their books, but you can’t please everyone.

That’s why, if there’s a genre or even a summary of a book that you don’t seem into, be honest with the author and say no to the request. Being honest and not wanting to risk a bad review will be much better than not enjoying the book.

The author will appreciate it.

Have you ever said no to a review request before? Let me know in the comments below!

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Archie, Vol. 2: The New Riverdale by Mark Waid

Title: Archie, Vol. 2: The New Riverdale
Author: Mark Waid, Veronica Fish (illustrator), Thomas Pitilli (illustrator), Ryan Jampole (illustrator)
Published: 
December 2016 by Archie Comics
Genre: Graphic Novel
How I got the book: I borrowed it from my sister

Summary:

The all-new ARCHIE adventure continues! Superstar writer Mark Waid teams up with the best and brightest artists in comics to bring a modern take to the legendary Riverdale cast of characters. The book will captures the bite and hilarious edge of Archie’s original tales in a modern, forward-looking manner, while still retaining the character’s all-ages appeal. If classic Archie is a Saturday morning cartoon, this new series is prime time!

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

After reading volume one, I immediately picked up volume two. I didn’t realize how much I missed these characters.

rp-plot

In these next six issues, the plot focuses on Archie’s relationship with Veronica and her father while he and Betty awkwardly try to reconfigure their friendship while they both see other people.

Veronica’s father and Betty’s uncle go against each other for mayor and Archie gets caught in the middle of the feud. Archie, Veronica, and Jughead start a band, so Betty and her friends start a band and they go head to head.

Each issue has its own mini-plot as it continues the overall plot of Archie’s life in general, especially his love life.

rp-characters

The characters, like in the first volume, are just as good. Archie is a wonderful protagonist. Each and every character has their own purpose and background. I enjoy seeing all their stories together.

rp-writing-style

The writing style is just as humorous as the last and the pictures, even though two of the illustrators are different, are beautiful. I really enjoy how they used the pictures and the words as a team to tell the story.

rp-overall

You can’t go wrong with this series. I love Archie and I’m looking forward to reading the next volume.

Archie, Vol. 2: The New Riverdale by Mark Waid gets…
5-Star Rating | Book Review 5 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“Crushing people is the truth’s hobby.” –Mark Waid, Archie, Vol. 2: The New Riverdale

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Archie, Vol. 1: The New Riverdale by Mark Waid

Archie, Vol. 1: The New Riverdale | Book Review

Title: Archie, Vol. 1: The New Riverdale
Author: Mark Waid, Fiona Staples (illustrations), Annie Wu (illustrator), Veronica Fish (illustrator)
Published: 
March 2016 by Archie Comics
Genre: Graphic Novel
How I got the book: I borrowed it from my sister

Summary:

America’s Favorite Teenager, Archie Andrews, is reborn in the pages of this must-have graphic novel collecting the first six issues of the comic book series that everyone is talking about. Meet Riverdale High teen Archie, his oddball, food-loving best friend Jughead, girl-next-door Betty and well-to-do snob Veronica Lodge as they embark on a modern reimagining of the beloved Archie world. It’s all here: the love triangle, friendship, humor, charm and lots of fun – but with a decidedly modern twist.

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

Kris used to have a subscription to the Archie comics for as long as I can remember. She’d get Archie, Betty & Veronica, Jughead, pretty much all of them. There are two drawers in my bedroom filled with all the Archie comics (mixed in with some superheroes and Looney Toons, I believe). She used to read them to me when I was still learning how to read and with this new artwork and storyline, we were both intrigued.

rp-plot

Volume 1 has six issues inside that all continue the same overall plot. Archie and Betty have broken up due to some “lipstick incident” after being together for practically their entire lives. Then rich girl Veronica moves to Riverdale and Archie falls head over heels in love.

It’s not until issue four when we find out what exactly broke Archie and Betty up. Still, the premise is that they miss each other, they miss being friends even though Betty moves on and Archie follows Veronica around like a puppy.

Most of the kids at their school scheme to get them back together, but Betty and Archie want nothing to do with it. Archie is more concerned about not being clumsy so he can keep a job all the while trying to impress Veronica’s father.

But then at the end, Reggie, the school bully, steps in to impress Veronica’s father even more.

rp-characters

Personality and characteristics wise, all the characters have pretty much stayed true to themselves. I’ve missed reading the Archie comics and reading these updated characters brought me right back to the olden days when I used to read them with my sister.

Archie, being the main character, is also the narrator. He talks to the reader knowing he’s telling a story. He’s an overall good guy, gives just enough back ground information, and is too clumsy for his own good. I absolutely love his character and he is ridiculously funny.

Betty is her tomboy self and Veronica is her rich-girl self. In this first volume they never actually met one another and Betty would watch Archie with her from afar.

Reggie is his normal bully-like self and then there’s Jughead. Jughead is one of my favorite characters. He witnesses all and as Archie’s best friend, he helps him out no matter what. Still, he acts as though he’s on nobody’s side but his own.

rp-writing-style

Volume 1 is made up of six comic issues, each one being broken up into three short “chapters.” At about 200 pages and being a graphic novel, this is a fairly quick read.

The script is funny and engaging the whole time and the illustrations are beautiful and incredibly detailed.

rp-overall

I love a good graphic novel every now and then and reading Archie brought me back to my childhood. If you were a fan of the Archie comics back then, you won’t be disappointed by this newest version.

Archie, Vol. 1: The New Riverdale by Mark Waid gets…
5-Star Rating | Book Review5 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“You are who you are. Not what people think you are. Be straight. Be weird. Be whatever. Just be what you wanna be.” –Mark Waid, Archie, Vol. 1: The New Riverdale

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Tone Of Voice When Writing Book Reviews

Writing a book review isn’t as easy as it sounds. When writing a review you’re stating your opinion on how you liked or disliked something.

When it comes to books, you have to remember that you’re commenting on someone’s hard work, someone’s precious baby.

Honesty is the most important thing when it comes to writing a book review. But with that honesty has to come a fair tone of voice.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but everyone interprets things differently. Something that you like may be something that someone else doesn’t like and vice versa.

When it comes to writing a review, mention things you enjoyed about the book.

If there’s anything you didn’t particularly care for in the book, say so. But…

  • Explain why you didn’t like it nicely (like I said, everyone has different opinions)
  • Suggest something that may have worked better

Not only are reviews a great way to thank an author, but it’s also a great way for authors to get some feedback. A lot of reviewers can agree upon a particular thing and the author may learn from it for their next book.

Still, there are some reviewers that don’t bother leaving a review if it’s a book that they really didn’t like for the sake of the author not getting any “bad reviews.”

All in all, book reviews are important but it’s all in the way they’re conveyed.

How do you typically convey your books reviews? Have you ever left a “bad review” before? Let me know in the comments below!

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How To Write A Book Review That Matters

Book reviews are fodder for authors. It’s important for their books. And, as a reader, we can thank the author by leaving a review for their book on your blog, Goodreads, Amazon, or anywhere the book can be bought.

How To Write a Book Review that Matters

Everyone has their own writing style and there are many ways to write a book review. For me, I write about the three parts of a book that is the most important to me. I also add an intro and conclusion, if you will.

First Thoughts

To begin the review I talk about my initial thoughts on the book. Why I decided to read it, where I got it, and what I think about the overall summary and maybe the cover as well.

Plot

I typically summarize the overall plot of the novel and then talk about what I felt worked with it and what I felt didn’t work with it.

Characters

I talk about the main and secondary characters and explain my thoughts on the character development of them all. I also mention which was my favorite and which ones I related to the most and also ones that I didn’t like.

Writing Style

Every author writes differently. Some use more dialogue than description, some write poetically. Some have short chapters, some write in parts. I comment on the author’s style and whether I think it worked or not for the story. This also includes POV.

Overall

To end the review I more or less summarize everything I wrote in the previous parts and mention whether I would recommend the book or not.

In addition to all that, I add a picture of the book’s cover, the title, the author, when and where it was published, the genre, and how I got the book. At the end, I give it a star rating between one and five. I also add links to where you can buy the book.

To add a little personal touch, I also include my favorite quote from the book. The quote is generally a line that stuck out at me for whatever reason, whether it was a nice piece of description, something funny, something heartfelt, something true to life, etc.

I’ve seen other book reviews by people and some of them go much more in depth than mine. Others are short and sweet simply stating why they liked the book or why they didn’t like it. And others still ramble on about general overall thoughts on the book.

Writing a book review isn’t hard and depending on your style, it definitely takes a few minutes out of your day. Still, it’s a great way to thank an author for all their hard work and effort, whether you enjoyed the book or not.

Do you typically write book reviews? What’s your style like? Let me know in the comments below!

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The Leaving by Tara Altebrando

The Leaving by Tara Altebrando | Book Review, Young Adult Mystery

Title: The Leaving
Author: Tara Altebrando
Published: 
June 2016 by Bloomsbury USA Childrens
Genre: Young adult mystery
How I got the book: I bought it

Summary:

Six were taken. Eleven years later, five come back–with no idea of where they’ve been.

Eleven years ago, six kindergarteners went missing without a trace. After all that time, the people left behind moved on, or tried to.

Until today. Today five of those kids return. They’re sixteen, and they are . . . fine. Scarlett comes home and finds a mom she barely recognizes, and doesn’t really recognize the person she’s supposed to be, either. But she thinks she remembers Lucas. Lucas remembers Scarlett, too, except they’re entirely unable to recall where they’ve been or what happened to them. Neither of them remember the sixth victim, Max. He doesn’t come back. Everyone wants answers. Most of all Max’s sister Avery, who needs to find her brother–dead or alive–and isn’t buying this whole memory-loss story.

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

This was sort of an impulse buy. If you know me, I love a good suspense story. The cover was what originally caught my eye. I read the summary on the back and I thought I’d give it a try. Then I thumbed through the pages, saw the fancy writing style on the inside, and decided that I definitely had to give it a try.

rp-plot

Eleven years ago, six kindergarteners went missing. They went to school on the first day and the busy never took them home. The own searched high and low, but no traces of them were found. Eleven years later, five return home not remembering where they had been, what happened, or for how long they were gone. Still, they remember basic skills they learned throughout the years, such as driving a car. One even knowing how to load a gun. Everyone is shaken up by their return and when they ask about Max, the sixth child, the other five have no idea who they’re talking about. Now the question is, are they lying?

This novel is written in the third person limited, but we follow three POV characters. Lucas and Scarlett, two of the stolen children, and Avery, Max’s little sister. Between the three of them, they start piecing together what might have happened and where Max could be.

It was an interesting tale of amnesia and a race against the clock as they try to find Max. The ending was certainly something I didn’t see coming. I even had a prediction and was completely wrong. It was certainly a cool twist on the “missing persons” plotline. However, with all the twists and turns and with two out of the three main POV characters, there wasn’t much room to try to figure things out for myself.

The person who was behind “The Leaving” was an interesting twist. I never would have guessed that person. It made sense, but the way they figured it out was out of left field. For the sake of spoilers, I won’t say any more on it, but I felt as though them figuring it out was kind of a cop-out.

rp-characters

Six went missing: Lucas, Scarlett, Max, Kristen, Sarah, and Adam. Max never came home and we follow Lucas and Scarlett. They talk to Kristen, Sarah, and Adam every once in a while, but for the most part, we don’t really see them.

Lucas and Scarlett were great POV characters. They had a lot of depth even though they couldn’t remember eleven years of their lives. Still, they slowly pieced everything together and it was fun to go through the motions with them. Plus, I liked both characters.

Then there’s Avery. I’m not entirely sure her story was needed. As Max’s little sister, she wanted answers. Great concept, great plot, but as the story went on she seemed to be more focused on wanting a relationship with Lucas and being jealous of Scarlett. I also didn’t think her story was complete. She breaks up with her boyfriend and then the chapter ends. Then we never see Sam again and never talk about that he ever existed again. She didn’t even care, she just wanted Lucas.

Avery had a little depth because while she wanted to find Max, a part of her wanted to find him dead. She thought it would be weird if he came home, her whole life would change. It’s sad and I totally understand her feelings on that. Still, since they were so young, we didn’t know anything about Max. And, as stated, Avery was more focused on her love life so I couldn’t sympathize her confliction about finding Max.

rp-writing-style

This was a thick book being at 421 pages. Each chapter alternated between the three POVs and the book was broken up into parts labeling the days. The book takes place in just 15 days total. The chapters were short and quick reads, especially with the way it was written.

Avery’s chapters were written as a typical novel. Scarlett’s were written almost poetically, the words sometimes literally flying off the page or making shapes. Lucas’s chapters were written as a regular novel, but a lot of his thoughts and memories were highlighted in black and written in white ink.

Despite its length, it made it for a quick and easy read. It was interesting and fun. And, even though the chapters were labeled with the POV character, I really didn’t need that confirmation. I was able to tell each voice just by reading and that was great.

rp-overall

This was a great read. I definitely think it would have been better without Avery’s story, or maybe less of her story. I think I would have enjoyed it more if the third POV was from Kristen. As the story goes on, we learn she and Scarlett have a history, but, since I didn’t know anything about Kristen I didn’t really care about it. And I would have liked to.

If you’re looking for a quick, fancy-written mystery, consider checking out this book. I think I’ll pick up Altebrando’s next book.

The Leaving by Tara Altebrando gets…
4 stars book review4 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“People aren’t shaped by conscious memories so much as they are by their overall life experience and bonds.” –Tara Altebrando, The Leaving

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The Dark And Deadly Pool by Joan Lowery Nixon

The Dark and Deadly Pool by Joan Lowery Nixon | Book Review

Title: The Dark and Deadly Pool
Author: Joan Lowery Nixon
Published: 
May 1989 by Laurel Leaf
Genre: Young adult mystery
How I got the book: I bought it

Summary:

Liz enjoys her summer pool job at the glamorous Ridley Hotel.  Until the night, a dark and lonely night, a ghasty shadow surges up from the pool.  A face — eyes wide, mouth gaping — stares at Liz.  A hand clutches at her sneaker.  Then it, whatever it is, is gone.

But danger isn’t.  Strange things are happening at the hotel, and a shaken Liz wants to know why.  But whoever is behind the trouble will stop at nothing — even murder — to get what he wants…

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

I used to love Joan Lowery Nixon’s books when I was younger. I’ve read this one before, but of course, I couldn’t remember anything about it. So I thought I’d give it another read.

rp-plot

Mary Elizabeth takes a summer job at a luxury hotel. She works in the pool area scrubbing tiles, collecting towels, and making sure the locker rooms are tidy. She’s also in charge of closing up the pool at the end of the night.

She’s afraid of the dark and being at a large empty resort alone in the dark scares her all the more. One night she stays a little later to calm her nerves and get over her fears. That’s when she sees a mysterious figure swimming in the pool. They scare each and he disappears. It’s later still that a body turns up in the pool. With the help of her co-workers, specifically Fran, Liz investigates and solves the various crimes and murders.

This mystery plot is like most where the non-detective protagonist attempts to solve crimes on her own. Whereas she didn’t have a suspect list, she was more interested in the why and the how. Of course, she wanted the criminal to be caught, but she was mostly curious as to how they were getting in and out of the hotel undetected.

The ending was unexpected as well as you try to figure it out along with Liz. The culprit is the least person you would suspect and, in the end, Liz didn’t really save the day. The law enforcement did.

rp-characters

I found all the characters to be enjoyable. I liked having Liz as the protagonist, even though her character development at the end was a bit out of the blue. She wanted a tall man for a boyfriend and Fran was much shorter than her. She was against being with him because of that, but at the end she randomly overlooked it.

Fran was a fun character as well. He was the comic relief, but he was also Liz’s rock throughout the whole endeavor. Tina, another employee, was like Liz’s best friend and she helped out a lot as well.

Then, of course, there were Liz’s bosses and the various guests at the hotel. It was a fun, well-rounded cast of characters.

rp-writing-style

Nixon did a wonderful job at portraying the mystery. Liz didn’t find or figure out any clues or evidence right away or too easily and each crime was spaced out just enough.

The words on the page flow well and are easy to read. This is another quick read being shy of 200 pages.

rp-overall

I enjoyed re-reading this story even though I didn’t remember much of it. I look forward to reading her other books, some I’ve already read before. I also look forward to re-reading this again in a few years. Nixon certainly has a way with words and all her books are great.

The Dark and Deadly Pool by Joan Lowery Nixon gets…
4 stars book review4 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“Take good care of yourself.”
“I will until you get home, Mom, and then I’ll give up and let you do it.” –Joan Lowery Nixon, The Dark And Deadly Pool

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Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer by John Grisham

Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer by John Grisham

Title: Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer
Author: John Grisham
Published: 
May 2011 by Puffin Books
Genre: Young adult mystery
How I got the book: I bought it

Summary:

In the small city of Strattenburg, there are many lawyers, and though he’s only thirteen years old, Theo Boone thinks he’s one of them. Theo knows every judge, policeman, court clerkNand a lot about the law. He dreams of a life in the courtroom. But he finds himself in court much sooner than expected. Because he knows so muchNmaybe too muchNhe is suddenly dragged into the middle of a sensational murder trial. A cold-blooded killer is about to go free, and only Theo knows the truth. The stakes are high, but Theo won’t stop until justice is served.

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

I’ve heard a lot of great things about John Grisham. He’s a well-known mystery author for adults, so when I saw his book targeted for younger audiences I wanted to give it a try.

 

rp-plot

This book follows Theodore Boone, nicknamed Theo, as he’s fascinated with the court and law surrounding it. His mother is a divorce lawyer and his father is a real estate lawyer so Theo knows more than a college student practicing law.

When a huge murder case goes to trial, Theo wants more than anything to skip school and sit in the trial. It’s not until a friend at school tells him an incriminating witness saw the culprit at the scene of the crime. The case is weak, the killer is about to go free, so Theo has to figure out a way to get this witness to step up so justice is served.

This plot is similar to other plots crime plots where the protagonist is trying to find loopholes in order to bring someone to justice. There was a slight twist on it as Theo is a 13-year-old kid and, surprisingly enough, unlike most plots, he doesn’t take matters into his own hands. He goes to his uncle and his parents for help. They band together to do what’s right.

rp-characters

I think my favorite characters in this story was Theo’s parents. Theo was a good protagonist, but he was 13-years-old and since he knew so much about law, everyone at school went to him for their problems (meaning their parents’ problems). I felt as though he was a bit of a Gary Stu, which was why I was so impressed that he went to his parents to help him out when he didn’t know what to do.

His parents were stern, but they were great people. In some books, the parents are weird, too strict, too nice, whatever. I felt as though they had a nice balance between them. They had their quirks, but they cared for Theo and his friends and did what they felt was right.

The other characters in the book, such as Uncle Ike, were great as well. I could have done less without Theo’s classmates, but it gave good insight into what Theo was like at school and such. However, he was in a Government class and his teacher often had Theo teach the class, which I didn’t agree with.

rp-writing-style

This book is classified as young adult, but I found it in the middle-grade section at my local bookstore. It was an easy, quick read. The chapters were fairly short and the narration was easy to follow along.

There wasn’t anything too special about Grisham’s writing style, but I’ll be checking out his other books nonetheless. I’m sure his adult books are great.

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This is the first book in a series and I’m interested in reading the other books. Still, I wasn’t into it enough to run out and get the next books right away.

Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer by John Grisham gets…
4 stars book review4 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“He did smile at her, though, but she did not return the smile. Her teeth were somewhere in the house.” –John Grisham, Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer

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