Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook By Shel Silverstein [Book Review]

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Book Review: Runny Babbit A Billy Sook by Shel Silverstein | Children's books | Poetry | Reading | RachelPoli.com

I got the book at Barnes & Noble when I was a kid.

Summary:

Runny Babbit is Shel Silverstein’s hilarious and New York Times-bestselling book of spoonerisms—words or phrases with letters or syllables swapped: bunny rabbit becomes Runny Babbit.

Welcome to the world of Runny Babbit and his friends Toe Jurtle, Skertie Gunk, Rirty Dat, Dungry Hog, Snerry Jake, and many others who speak a topsy-turvy language all their own.

So if you say, “Let’s bead a rook
That’s billy as can se,”
You’re talkin’ Runny Babbit talk,
Just like mim and he.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

As usual, Silverstein’s cover doesn’t disappoint. It’s out of the ordinary yet simple.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

Shel Silverstein was one of my favorites back when I was a kid. I read and reviewed Where The Sidewalk Ends and Falling Up and, coincidentally, my mom found this one in the garage the day the second review went up. So I read this one as well.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

As usual, this book is filled with charming and silly poems. Shel Silverstein thinks outside the box when it comes to the imagination. It’s a quick read and the poems are great fun to read aloud with others.Overall | RachelPoli.com

It was fun to revisit this one. It’s a book I’ll keep in my library forever and will share with my nieces and nephews for sure.

Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook by Shel Silverstein gets…
Book Review Rating System | 5 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com5 out of 5 cups

Favorite Quote:

“Runny’s Nicpic

One day Runny Babbit
Met little Franny Fog.
He said, “Let’s have a nicpic
Down by the lollow hog.”
He brought some cutter bookies,
Some teanuts and some pea.
And what did Franny Fog bring?
Her whole fog framily.” -Shel Silverstein, Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Abe Books

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and if you enjoyed this post, please share it around!

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Time To Write: Only Dialogue [Creative Writing Prompt]

Last week’s writing prompt was a set the scene prompt. Check out some great pieces by fellow writers:

Now onto this week’s writing prompt:

Creative Writing Prompt | Only Dialogue | Flash Fiction | RachelPoli.com

Write a story using only dialogue.

If you use this prompt, please leave a link to your post in the comments below and I’ll share it next week. Please be sure to link back to my blog so your readers know where you got the prompt!

Happy Writing! If you want more, check out all my other Writing Prompts here!

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How Do You Write Internal Dialogue?

Internal dialogue can be more confusing than one would think. I don’t believe there’s a “right” way or “wrong” way to write internal dialogue, but I’ve seen plenty of people write it in different ways. I’ll admit, I have a preference, but that’s just my opinion.

How do you write internal dialogue | Creative Writing | Writing Tips | Dialogue tips | RachelPoli.com

There are different forms of internal dialogue – direct and indirect.

Direct Internal Dialogue

Direct refers to a character thinking to themselves in first person. This means these are thoughts they’re actually thinking, not thoughts we believe – or the narrator is telling us – they’re thinking. This can be written in two ways: using quotations or italics.

Using quotations makes it seem like the character is speaking aloud. It’s up to the dialogue tag to show that the character is actually thinking instead of speaking.

Using italics without quotations, but still using dialogue tags, makes it easy to differentiate between thoughts and speaking. Both are fine ways to write internal dialogue, but I prefer the italics. I find it easier to read and follow along.

Indirect Internal Dialogue

Similar to direct internal dialogue except it’s written in third person. This also means the narrator is telling us what a character is wondering, or may be wondering. So it’s not the exact thoughts from the character but we have an idea of what they may be thinking.

How do you typically write internal dialogue? Do you like using quotations or italics? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

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WIP Wednesday [August 2018]

Don’t even ask me how we’ve made it to the middle of August already because I’m kind of in disbelief of it myself. Though I know I shouldn’t be surprised because literally all of 2018 has zipped by. But anyway, here’s my August WIP Wednesday.

WIP Wednesday August 2018 | Creative Writing | Novels | Patreon | RachelPoli.com

First, I’ll say that August got off to an interesting start. For about the first week I was barely home due to family and friend gatherings. So, I got zero writing done that first week, plus a few extra days. I’m trying to change that and get a schedule in order.

George Florence & The Perfect Alibi

I’ve officially started rewrites for this final draft! Well, technically it’s not the “final” draft because it’ll need another round of edits or two when it’s done, but this is my final draft to write. The story will be finished after this, I promise. (At least, I hope I promise.)

Silhouettes

This is my next Wattpad project. I haven’t exactly pin-pointed the genre just yet. I had an idea for what it was going to be but it might change. I’ll mention some more information on this one soon enough, but writing the first draft has begun. I’m hoping to get it up on Wattpad sometime in October.

Patreon Project

This one is going well. I’ll be revealing this to the public soon (Maybe September). This project is being funded by my patrons on Patreon which is why only they know about it right now. They’ll be getting some special goodies along with it as well. So, if this interests you, feel free to check out my Patreon.

What projects are you currently working on? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Falling Up By Shel Silverstein [Book Review]

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through these links I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks so much for your support!

Book Review: Falling Up by Shel Silverstein | Poetry | Reading | Childrens books | RachelPoli.com

I got the book at Barnes & Noble when I was a kid.

Summary:

Millie McDeevit screamed a scream
So loud it made her eyebrows steam.
She screamed so loud
Her jawbone broke,
Her tongue caught fire,
Her nostrils smoked…

Poor Screamin’ Millie is just one of the unforgettable characters in this wondrous new book of poems and drawings by the creator of Where the Sidewalk Ends and A Light in the Attic. Here you will also meet Allison Beals and her twenty-five eels; Danny O’Dare, the dancin’ bear; the Human Balloon; and Headphone Harold.

So come, wander through the Nose Garden, ride the Little Hoarse, eat in the Strange Restaurant, and let the magic of Shel Silverstein open your eyes and tickle your mind.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

The cover portrays the title well and matches the illustrations used inside the book to explain the poetry.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

I was very much into Where The Sidewalk Ends when I was a kid, so I ended up getting this book as well.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

Shel Silverstein upholds his reputation of writing silly yet witty poetry for kids. Each poem has the same premise of using the imagination and also having a certain rhyme or rhythm to it yet the content of each poem is vastly different from the last. The lengths of the poems vary, but they’re all quick reads and this is a book to keep turning the pages.Overall | RachelPoli.com

This was a great book to revisit from when I was a kid. My nephew is about 2.5 and I’d love to read this book with him sometime. This is a great one for kids.

Falling Up by Shel Silverstein gets…
Book Review Rating System | 5 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com5 out of 5 cups

Favorite Quote:

“No teacher, preacher, parent, friend
Or wise man can decide
What’s right for you – just listen to
The voice that speaks inside.” -Shel Silverstein, Falling Up

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Abe Books

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and if you enjoyed this post, please share it around!

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All About Dialogue Tags

Dialogue tags are important and essential to use in every story we write. Are they always needed? No, but we do need them from time to time in order to know which characters are talking to each other or to themselves. So this post is all about dialogue tags.

All About Dialogue Tags | Creative Writing | Writing Tips | Writing Advice | RachelPoli.com

What is a dialogue tag?

A dialogue tag is a tag that goes before, in between, or after a piece of dialogue. It’s that little quip that says, “he said” or “Rachel cheered.”

How do you use dialogue tags?

Well, as I said they can go before or after the dialogue or in between it. Depending on where you put the tag, you need to make sure your punctuation is correct to go along with the dialogue. For example…

Rachel asked, “Where were you last night?”

“Why are you asking?” Chase replied.

“Well,” Rachel sighed, “you didn’t answer any of my phone calls.”

When do you use dialogue tags?

This is sort of like personal preference but also you need to read your manuscript and see what makes sense.

If there’s two characters speaking to each other and the banter is quick, one right after another, you can get away without using dialogue tags. Of course, use them in the beginning to make sure your readers know who is speaking.

“I didn’t know you were trying to call.” Chase said.

“Um, maybe you should check your phone then?” Rachel replied.

“What did you want, anyway?”

“It doesn’t matter now.”

If there’s a lot of detail and description in between the dialogue, a tag doesn’t hurt to remind your readers who’s speaking next. Also, if there are more than two characters speaking with one another, it’s a good idea to use tags so they knows who’s talking.

“What’s all the bickering about?” Chip asked.

“I think Chase is hiding something from me.” Rachel answered.

“It’s not just from you.” Chase replied.

“See?” Rachel exclaimed.

“Guys, please…” Chip sighed.

Overall, dialogue tags are a great way to convey the message to your readers about who is speaking and how they’re saying it. Though it’s not always needed and your readers can always infer based on what they already know.

Do you use dialogue tags a lot? Did I miss anything? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Short Story Sunday 225: Underneath [Part 2 – Interactive Story]

Short Story: Underneath (Part 2) | Flash Fiction | Short Story | Interactive Story | RachelPoli.com

Did you read Part One?

            Pixel turned around to walk away. She could hear the two boys chatting away about this “Underneath” thing, their voices getting softer the more she distanced herself from them. She had barely made it around the corner of the corridor before she twisted her heels right back around continuing to walk at her usual pace but back toward the boys again.

“Hello?” she called to them immediately flinching. That greeting didn’t sound convincing at all.

Still, it got their attention. Both boys immediately stopped speaking, frozen, eyes wide.

Pixel stopped once she was a few feet apart from them. “Uh, hi.” She said again.

“Hi?” Alvin responded. His eyes shifted toward Miles, who kept a steady gaze on Pixel.

“Can we help you with something?” Miles asked. He stood taller folding his arms across his chest, his muscles flexing in the process. Pixel took a step back. Was he going to try to fight her or something?

“Probably not,” Pizel said shaking her head. “I mean, you probably shouldn’t. I really came over here to talk to you because I’m nosy. Sorry. I didn’t want to interrupt. In fact, I walked away… but then I decided to come back for… some reason…” she began to chuckle. It was the kind of laugh that escaped your lips when you were really nervous or embarrassed – and she was definitely feeling both emotions.

Miles dropped his arms by his side. He sighed. “So, you heard us talking, then?”

Pixel hesitated to answer. She wasn’t sure what the right answer was. If she told them the truth that she was eavesdropping, they might get mad. Then again, it seemed as though they already knew she overheard them. So, if she lied, they might get mad at her for being a liar.

“I’m a freshman, new here, I don’t know where my class is. Help?” she blurted quickly and immediately regretted it.

Alvin burst out laughing. In fact, he nearly doubled over in he was laughing so hard. Pixel couldn’t tell, but it seemed as though there were tears coming out of his eyes. Miles, on the other hand, just looked confused.

“Listen, Lady,” Alvin said in between breaths, “while I believe that, I think it’s pretty obvious why you’re talking to us right now.”

Pixel felt herself blush.

“You wanna know about the Underneath too, huh?” Miles said with a smirk.

Pixel found herself nodding. She didn’t know why either. She didn’t want to be attending high school. She wanted to keep a low profile. Whatever these boys were thinking or planning, it must have been against school rules. So why was she trying to get involved in it?

Miles stretched out a hand. “Miles, as you might have heard. I’m a sophomore here.”

As Pixel shook Miles’s hand she noticed Alvin waving behind him. “I’m Alvin. I’m a freshman too, though I’m supposed to be a sophomore. I stayed back.”

Pixel nodded. She had no idea what that meant though she had a guess. She certainly didn’t want to repeat any high school years. Talking to these boys probably wasn’t the best decision she’s made… and she’s only been in high school for about an hour.

“So, you’re a freahman, new here, apparently.” Miles prompted. “What’s your name?”

Pixel opened her mouth and then froze. Pixel wasn’t a normal name. She was to keep a low profile here and she knew with a name like Pixel people would ask questions.

Words: 591

I’m writing this story with your help! Please be sure to vote in the poll above for what should happen next in the story.

I hope you enjoyed part one of the story! Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around. Also, check out the other Short Story Sundays I’ve done!

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Where The Sidewalk Ends By Shel Silverstein [Book Review]

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through these links I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks so much for your support!

Book Review: Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein | Reading | Poetry | Children's books | RachelPoli.com

I got it when I was a kid from Barnes & Noble.

Summary:

Where the sidewalk ends, Shel Silverstein’s world begins. There you’ll meet a boy who turns into a TV set and a girl who eats a whale. The Unicorn and the Bloath live there, and so does Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout who will not take the garbage out. It is a place where you wash your shadow and plant diamond gardens, a place where shoes fly, sisters are auctioned off, and crocodiles go to the dentist.

My Review:

Book Cover | RachelPoli.com

I’ve always loved the book cover. It paints the title of the poetry collection so well. The drawing is simple and while it may seem bland to some, I find it to be perfect to go along with the illustrations inside the book.

First Thoughts | RachelPoli.com

I used to read Shel Silverstein a lot when I was a kid. I found this on my shelf and decided to read it again for old time’s sake.

Writing Style | RachelPoli.com

This is a collection of poetry aimed toward kids. Some poems can be long, but most of them are pretty short being less than a page long. A lot of the poems have illustrations similar to the cover to accompany the poem which are all well done.

The poems are silly and completely unrealistic, but that’s what makes them great. They usually rhyme and you can’t help but read them with some sort of rhythm in your tone.

Overall | RachelPoli.com

It was great to revisit Shel Silverstein again. I haven’t read his poems in a long time and I forgot how great they were. This is a must read for kids who are looking for something quick and silly.

Where The Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein gets…
Book Review Rating System | 5 Cups of Coffee | RachelPoli.com5 out of 5 cups

Favorite Quote:

“If you’re a bird, be an early bird–
But if you’re a worm, sleep late.” -Shel Silverstein, Where The Sidewalk Ends

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Abe Books

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and if you enjoyed this post, please share it around!

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Sign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Time To Write: Set The Scene 10 [Creative Writing Prompt]

Last week’s writing prompt was a sentence starter. Check out some great pieces by fellow writers:

Now onto this week’s writing prompt:

Creative Writing Prompt: Set the Scene | Short Story | Flash Fiction | Inspiration | RachelPoli.com

Write a story based in the scene above.

If you use this prompt, please leave a link to your post in the comments below and I’ll share it next week. Please be sure to link back to my blog so your readers know where you got the prompt!

Happy Writing! If you want more, check out all my other Writing Prompts here!

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

The Best Tip To Know About Writing Dialogue

Writing dialogue can be such a hit or miss. It’s something you can improve in but I feel like some authors are really good at it and some just aren’t. So, here’s the best tip to know about writing dialogue – in my opinion.

The Best Tip To Know About Writing Dialogue | Creative Writing | Writing Tips | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

Keep It Realistic

Dialogue can be such a hit or miss. It can take a little while to get it “right.” When I said right, I mean get it to sound realistic.

It’s easy to make your characters sound like robots. Unless they really are robots, you don’t want them sounding like that.

The main goal of the dialogue is to get your characters speaking as though they’re real people having a real conversation.

This is pretty simple as though you write as you or anyone else would normally speak. The hardest part, I think, is to ignore the editor. If you write in Word Document then you know the red squiggly lines come after you – when you try to have someone stammer or when you try to have someone speak unclearly. Word doesn’t like it.

I’ll admit, I’ve edited my dialogue based on Word for a while. Then I realized it just didn’t sound realistic and now I try my best to ignore Word. I mean, Word is right sometimes, but not when it comes to that.

Be sure to listen to how people talk. Hear how they pronounce their words, tones, emotions, and even accents. Treat your characters like real people and you should be good to go.

What do you think? Do you agree with me or do you have any other tips? Let me know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around.

Blog Signature | RachelPoli.comPatreon | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | GoodReads | Double JumpSign up for Rachel Poli's Newsletter and get a FREE 14-page Writing Tracker! | Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com