Posted in Book Reviews, Reading

Gramma Mouse Tells a Story by M.E. Hembroff

gramma-mouse-tells-a-story

Title: Gramma Mouse Tells a Story
Author: M.E. Hembroff
Published: 
October 2016 by TellWell
Genre: Children’s Picture Book
How I got the book: I received a free digital copy from the author in exchange for an honest review.

Summary:

Gramma Mouse is visiting and relaxing when her grandbabies beg her to tell them a story.
Tiny, Gramma Mouse, tells them about her trip across the old garden to visit Cousin Mouse.
Tiny struts off staying out of sight at first. Then she pops out to look around and immediately forgets Ma and Pa’s advice. She stops to visit and look around. She receives warnings of approaching danger that she ignores. Tiny is having fun playing and investigating and forgets to watch for danger. She has a few narrow escapes but does learn valuable lessons along the way.

My Review:

rp-first-thoughts

The author has contacted me before to read her middle-grade story novel and I enjoyed it. I also love a good children’s book, so I felt Gramma Mouse Tells a Story would be a refreshing read.

However, since this is a picture book, the review won’t be as in-depth as my other reviews. But all the elements are still there.

rp-plot

The main “plot” of this story is that Gramma Mouse, as a young mouse, is trying to journey to Cousin Mouse’s house avoiding the cat, dog, and hawk. It’s a long journey and Tiny, as she used to be called, comes across many creatures, including the cat, dog, and hawk. However, she’s careful as the other creatures around her warn her of the danger. She’s able to hide herself until the danger passes and can continue her journey.

In the end, Tiny makes it to Cousin Mouse’s house and is safe with her friend.

rp-characters

Gramma Mouse is really the only character that we prominently see. Her parents warn her of the danger, but she’s cautious and remembers what her parents had told her before she began her journey. She’s a careful mouse, also listening to the creatures around her and is aware of her surroundings.

Also, having a mouse as the main character as opposed to a human makes the story more child-friendly and unique. I think a mouse was especially a good choice because they’re small and can easily get into danger.

rp-writing-style

As a preschool teacher, I particularly enjoyed the writing style. Each page throughout Gramma Mouse’s journey is repetitive stating at the end of each page, “it was still a long way to Cousin Mouse’s.” And, “I was getting closer,” and “it wasn’t much further.” It shows just how long the journey really is.

Is also showcases the tension. When Gramma Mouse is hiding from the cat and she mentions that she still has a long way to go, you have to wonder what other danger she’ll get up to.

Also, the illustrations to go along with each page were pretty. They looked to be hand-drawn and the colors were vivid and each picture captured the text wonderfully.

rp-overall

This was a cute story book that I can picture myself reading to my preschoolers at work. It was a quick read, of course, but worth it.

Gramma Mouse Tells a Story by M.E. Hembroff gets…
4-stars
4 out of 5 stars

Favorite Quote:

“I popped out and looked around. There were interesting things to see.” –M.E. Hembroff, Gramma Mouse Tells a Story

Buy the book:

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Author:

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Rachel Poli is a writer and blogger. She has an associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education and a bachelor’s degree in English Studies. She enjoys writing young adult novels, middle-grade, and children’s picture books. She is currently working on her first novel.

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