Posted in Inspiration Station, Mystery Month, Writing

Mystery Terms

Mystery Terms

Here are some terms to use in your mystery novels to make yourself sound like a detective.

Accessory — A person who assists in a crime

Alibi — An excuse used by an accused person to prove he or she wasn’t at the scene of the crime

Breakthrough — A big discovery in an investigation

Capital Murder — A murder that can be punishable by death

Case File — A collection of documents pertaining to a specific investigation

Deduce — Logical reasoning and thinking to infer information

Evidence — Clues to help solve a crime; can be a statement, fact, or object

Felony — A crime punishable by either death or confinement in a state correctional facility

Fugitive — A person who escapes or evades arrest or imprisonment

Homicide — The killing of a human being by another human being

Interrogate — To ask questions and get information from people about a crime

Motive — The reason a person does what he/she does

Parole — Allowing a prisoner to serve the remainder of their time outside of prison

Perpetrator — Someone guilty of a crime

Red Herring — A false clue to throw investigators off track

Suspect — Someone who might have committed a crime

Victim — A person harmed by a crime

Warrant — A written order directing someone to do something

Witness — A person who saw something related to a crime

Of course there are many other vocabulary terms to use when it comes to writing a mystery novel. This is the most I could think of that I knew exactly what they were.

I hope this helps!

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Author:

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Rachel Poli is a writer and blogger. She has an associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education and a bachelor’s degree in English Studies. She enjoys writing young adult novels, middle-grade, and children’s picture books. She is currently working on her first novel.

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